Commit 51ce8d20 authored by Philip Withnall's avatar Philip Withnall

gtestutils: Document difference between g_assert() and g_assert_*()

g_assert() must not be used in tests. g_assert_*() must not be used in
production code.
Signed-off-by: Philip Withnall's avatarPhilip Withnall <withnall@endlessm.com>

GNOME/glib#976
parent ad3947c4
......@@ -87,14 +87,18 @@
* creates a test suite called "misc" with a single test case named
* "assertions", which consists of running the test_assertions function.
*
* In addition to the traditional g_assert(), the test framework provides
* In addition to the traditional g_assert_true(), the test framework provides
* an extended set of assertions for comparisons: g_assert_cmpfloat(),
* g_assert_cmpfloat_with_epsilon(), g_assert_cmpint(), g_assert_cmpuint(),
* g_assert_cmphex(), g_assert_cmpstr(), and g_assert_cmpmem(). The
* advantage of these variants over plain g_assert() is that the assertion
* advantage of these variants over plain g_assert_true() is that the assertion
* messages can be more elaborate, and include the values of the compared
* entities.
*
* Note that g_assert() should not be used in unit tests, since it is a no-op
* when compiling with `G_DISABLE_ASSERT`. Use g_assert() in production code,
* and g_assert_true() in unit tests.
*
* A full example of creating a test suite with two tests using fixtures:
* |[<!-- language="C" -->
* #include <glib.h>
......@@ -473,7 +477,10 @@
*
* The macro can be turned off in final releases of code by defining
* `G_DISABLE_ASSERT` when compiling the application, so code must
* not depend on any side effects from @expr.
* not depend on any side effects from @expr. Similarly, it must not be used
* in unit tests, otherwise the unit tests will be ineffective if compiled with
* `G_DISABLE_ASSERT`. Use g_assert_true() and related macros in unit tests
* instead.
*/
/**
......@@ -484,7 +491,8 @@
* application is terminated.
*
* The macro can be turned off in final releases of code by defining
* `G_DISABLE_ASSERT` when compiling the application.
* `G_DISABLE_ASSERT` when compiling the application. Hence, it should not be
* used in unit tests, where assertions should always be effective.
*/
/**
......@@ -497,6 +505,10 @@
* an error message is logged and the application is either
* terminated or the testcase marked as failed.
*
* Note that unlike g_assert(), this macro is unaffected by whether
* `G_DISABLE_ASSERT` is defined. Hence it should only be used in tests and,
* conversely, g_assert() should not be used in tests.
*
* See g_test_set_nonfatal_assertions().
*
* Since: 2.38
......@@ -512,6 +524,10 @@
* an error message is logged and the application is either
* terminated or the testcase marked as failed.
*
* Note that unlike g_assert(), this macro is unaffected by whether
* `G_DISABLE_ASSERT` is defined. Hence it should only be used in tests and,
* conversely, g_assert() should not be used in tests.
*
* See g_test_set_nonfatal_assertions().
*
* Since: 2.38
......@@ -527,6 +543,10 @@
* an error message is logged and the application is either
* terminated or the testcase marked as failed.
*
* Note that unlike g_assert(), this macro is unaffected by whether
* `G_DISABLE_ASSERT` is defined. Hence it should only be used in tests and,
* conversely, g_assert() should not be used in tests.
*
* See g_test_set_nonfatal_assertions().
*
* Since: 2.38
......@@ -542,6 +562,10 @@
* an error message is logged and the application is either
* terminated or the testcase marked as failed.
*
* Note that unlike g_assert(), this macro is unaffected by whether
* `G_DISABLE_ASSERT` is defined. Hence it should only be used in tests and,
* conversely, g_assert() should not be used in tests.
*
* See g_test_set_nonfatal_assertions().
*
* Since: 2.40
......
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