Commit b75794a7 authored by Niklas Mattisson's avatar Niklas Mattisson

Modified ChangeLog. Tutorial section is now using <hx> tags instead of

Modified ChangeLog.
Tutorial section is now using <hx> tags instead of <div class="">.
Fixed a few validation problems in Perlotine tutorial.
parent a36aa601
2003-03-20 scizzo <scizzo@gimp.org>
* /tutorials/*/index.html: Now uses the <hx> tags for headings instead
of <div class="">.
* /tutorials/Perlotine/*.html: Looked at the validation more.
2003-03-19 Helvetix Victorinox <helvetix@mysterious.org>
* install.sh (log): Added a timestamp to the install log: make.out
......
......@@ -2,16 +2,16 @@
<title>GIMP - 3-d Floating Logo</title>
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-look-feel.xhtml" -->
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-tutorial-init.xhtml" -->
<div class="heading">3-d Floating Logo</div>
<h1>3-d Floating Logo</h1>
<div class="subtitle">Intention</div>
<h2>Intention</h2>
<p>
This tutorial is aimed squarely at the novice GIMP user. The more experienced user may find some techniques here useful.
This is the same procedure I used to create the logo on my homepage, albeit with slightly different settings. I'll point
out the differences as I go along. I've taken a lot of screen shots to support this tutorial, so enjoy :)
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 1</div>
<h2>Step 1</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-00.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@
website at the time of writing uses 500px tables.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 2</div>
<h2>Step 2</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-01.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@
Do so by accessing the Layers menu (right click or Control+Click on the layer you wish to operate on) and select Layer to Imagesize.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 3</div>
<h2>Step 3</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-02.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -42,7 +42,7 @@
Keep Trans. means "Keep Transparency"; this will ensure that any transformations or fills made to that layer will only affect the non-transparent part of the image.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 4</div>
<h2>Step 4</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-03.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -54,7 +54,7 @@
You will need to make sure that the layer boundary is larger than the layer so that the blur can spread nicely. Step 2 mentions this.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 5</div>
<h2>Step 5</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-04.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -62,7 +62,7 @@
Duplicate the blurred layer once (tmp1 and tmp2). These layers are used to create the edge lighting for the text.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 6</div>
<h2>Step 6</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-05.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -73,7 +73,7 @@
a very similar thing to that one soon.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 7</div>
<h2>Step 7</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-06.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -83,7 +83,7 @@
This was done to make sure I could see how far I moved this layer during step 6.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 8</div>
<h2>Step 8</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-07.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -91,7 +91,7 @@
Now that the layer is selected...
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 9</div>
<h2>Step 9</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-08.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@
Select the highlight layer and...
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 10</div>
<h2>Step 10</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-09.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -111,7 +111,7 @@
then make the cut from the lowlight layer. Once you're done, delete the two blurred layers (tmp1 and tmp2).
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 11</div>
<h2>Step 11</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-10.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -120,7 +120,7 @@
to clean up temporary layers occasionally.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 12</div>
<h2>Step 12</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-11.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -130,7 +130,7 @@
Keep Trans. is checked when you fill the layer.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 13</div>
<h2>Step 13</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-12.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -138,7 +138,7 @@
As you can see, it's starting to look like something now.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 14</div>
<h2>Step 14</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-13.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -147,7 +147,7 @@
layers stack until it's underneath the original text layer.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 15</div>
<h2>Step 15</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-14.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -158,7 +158,7 @@
fill it (step 17). And below is what it looks like.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 16</div>
<h2>Step 16</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-15.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -166,7 +166,7 @@
And this is what it looks like.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 17</div>
<h2>Step 17</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-16.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -181,7 +181,7 @@
toolbox color swatch to the layer.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 18</div>
<h2>Step 18</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-17.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -189,7 +189,7 @@
This is what the Layers, Channels, &amp; Paths dialog should look like.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 19</div>
<h2>Step 19</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-18.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -197,7 +197,7 @@
I've duplicated the highlight and lowlight layers and made them all blend with the lower layers using the Overlay mode. This helps to make the edges more 3D.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 20</div>
<h2>Step 20</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-19.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -205,7 +205,7 @@
Create a new transparent layer called rust and select the bezier tool (shown here as the depressed button).
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 21</div>
<h2>Step 21</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-20.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -214,7 +214,7 @@
layer to start a selection that looks like...
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 22</div>
<h2>Step 22</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-21.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -224,7 +224,7 @@
Use <span class="filter">&lt;Image&gt;Select-&gt;Feather</span> to feather (blur) the selection. I used a value of about 10 pixels.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 23</div>
<h2>Step 23</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-22.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -235,7 +235,7 @@
This will leave only the part of the rust layer that actually covers the letters and not the extra.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 24</div>
<h2>Step 24</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-23.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -243,7 +243,7 @@
Change the Layer Mode of the rust layer to Muliply (Burn).
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 25</div>
<h2>Step 25</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-24.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -251,7 +251,7 @@
The image should now look a little like this. Don't worry, it'll look better soon.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 26</div>
<h2>Step 26</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-25.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -259,7 +259,7 @@
With the rust layer selected, add a Layer Mask.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 27</div>
<h2>Step 27</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-26.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -267,7 +267,7 @@
Making sure that you reset the color swatches on the toolbox, use the gradient tool to make a gradient in the Layer Mask so it looks like this.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 28</div>
<h2>Step 28</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-27.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -275,19 +275,21 @@
The image should now look like this.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Final</div>
<h2>Final</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="logo-28.png" alt=""/>
</p>
<p>
With a little playing around you can get to this. I duplicated the rust layer and moved them (the original rust and the copy) down the stack until
the highlight and lowlight layers were above them. I also duplicated the original text layer, switched on Keep Trans., and used
<span class="filter">&lt;Image&gt;Render-&gt;Clouds-&gt;Solid Noise</span> to add a bit of interest to the layer. Try using the Curves tool to help with this.
<span class="filter">&lt;Image&gt;Render-&gt;Clouds-&gt;Solid Noise</span> to add a bit of interest to the layer.
Try using the Curves tool to help with this.
You may also notice that the outline layer is blurred. Sometimes this can help.
The idea is, try stuff and find out.
</p>
<p>
Well, thats it. Hope that taught you the power of selections and layer modes to some degree. There are many people who tout the use of channel masks,
Well, thats it. Hope that taught you the power of selections and layer modes to some degree.
There are many people who tout the use of channel masks,
but don't under estimate the power of selections to do your dirty work.
</p>
......
......@@ -2,9 +2,9 @@
<title>GIMP - Advanced Animations Tutorial</title>
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-look-feel.xhtml" -->
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-tutorial-init.xhtml" -->
<div class="heading">Advanced Animations Tutorial</div>
<h1>Advanced Animations Tutorial</h1>
<div class="subtitle">Intention</div>
<h2>Intention</h2>
<p>
Welcome to the advanced GIMP animation tutorial. Here you'll learn how to use the GAP, GIMP animation package.
It is very advanced, but the user interface might be confusing for some at first.
......@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@
Please go to the "<a href="/tutorials/Using_GAP/">Using GAP</a>" tutorial to learn more about the tool.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 1</div>
<h2>Step 1</h2>
<p class="images">
<a href="gap-static.xcf.bz2"><img src="gap-static.png" alt=""/></a>
</p>
......@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@
URL to the open dialog. Gimp will download the compressed image and open it transparently so you don't have to bother.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 2</div>
<h2>Step 2</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="gap-duplicate.png" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -40,7 +40,7 @@
We'll create a 20 frame animation, so the first thing will be to copy the first frame 19 times using the video/duplicate frames function.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 3</div>
<h2>Step 3</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="gap-source.png" alt=""/>
<img src="gap-move.png" alt=""/>
......@@ -61,7 +61,7 @@
just set a specific frame to the active point using the keyframe slider. We won't need it fof the logo animation, so let's just press ok for now.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 4</div>
<h2>Step 4</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="gap-navi.png" alt=""/>
<img src="gap-final.gif" alt=""/>
......@@ -79,7 +79,7 @@
You can now try to recreate the animation yourself, you know tool to be able to.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 5</div>
<h2>Step 5</h2>
<p>
All we need to do now is to save the animation. You can choose to go for the GIF format as I did with the image above,
but the filesize is too huge to be widely accepted on the web anyway, so you can consider using a regular animation format
......
......@@ -2,16 +2,16 @@
<title>GIMP - Anti-Aliased Threshold Tutorial</title>
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-look-feel.xhtml" -->
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-tutorial-init.xhtml" -->
<div class="heading">Anti-Aliased Threshold Tutorial</div>
<h1>Anti-Aliased Threshold Tutorial</h1>
<div class="subtitle">Intention</div>
<h2>Intention</h2>
<p>
The threshold plug-in works by dividing the image into two parts, dark and light, producing a 2 color image. This is often not
the desired result, for some images anti-aliasing is needed, but the threshold plug-in
cannot provide that. With a little utilization of the curves plug-in, we get nice results.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Problems with the threshold</div>
<h2>Problems with the threshold</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="original.jpg" alt=""/>
<img src="threshold.jpg" alt=""/>
......@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@
for the Threshold plug-in were used (<span class="filter">&lt;Image&gt;Image-&gt;Colors-&gt;Threshold</span>). The resulting image is very blocky and aliased.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">The Curves Trick</div>
<h2>The Curves Trick</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="curves.jpg" alt=""/>
<img src="finished.jpg" alt=""/>
......@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@
the right.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">A neat addition</div>
<h2>A neat addition</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="effect.jpg" alt=""/>
</p>
......
......@@ -2,9 +2,9 @@
<title>GIMP - Basic Perl</title>
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-look-feel.xhtml" -->
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-tutorial-init.xhtml" -->
<div class="heading">Basic Perl</div>
<h1>Basic Perl</h1>
<div class="subtitle">Intention</div>
<h2>Intention</h2>
<p>
One of the wonderful features of GIMP is that it all its functionality may be accessed through scripting.
So far most of the script programming for Gimp has been done through Scheme through Script-Fu.
......@@ -18,7 +18,7 @@
and will instead concentrate on the use GIMP together with the of the perl modules Gimp and Gimp::Fu, written by Marc Lehmann, <a href="mailto:pcg@goof.com">pcg@goof.com</a>
</p>
<div class="subtitle">1. What You Need</div>
<h2>1. What You Need</h2>
<p>
The Perl::Gimp tutorial scripts have been tested with the following versions:
</p>
......@@ -33,7 +33,7 @@
It is also possible to download them in RPM format from the ftp.gimp.org website.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">2. The Gimp module</div>
<h2>2. The Gimp module</h2>
<p>
Most scripts make use of the simplified interface Gimp::Fu provided with the Gimp module.
Gimp::Fu provides a framework for entering parameters to the script in a frame like interface,
......@@ -57,7 +57,7 @@
The use of the ":auto" statement makes perl automatically include all of the gimp PDB functions and constants into the perl name space.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">3. The GIMP PDB</div>
<h2>3. The GIMP PDB</h2>
<p>
Before going into the details of the Perl-Fu script, we will describe how to access the various the functionality of GIMP.
All functions known to GIMP are available through the procedural database (PDB). All the PDB functions may be called from perl, as will be seen below.
......@@ -118,7 +118,7 @@ They can be added to an image using the 'gimp_image_add_layer' command
only the drawable should be given as argument in the calling sequence.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">4. Gimp::Fu and the register function</div>
<h2>4. Gimp::Fu and the register function</h2>
<p>
Gimp-Fu is perl's answer to Script-Fu. It provides a simplified method for accepting parameters for a script through a Gtk interface,
just like script-fu, but as we shall see below, it has some additional bells and whistles.
......@@ -206,7 +206,7 @@ They can be added to an image using the 'gimp_image_add_layer' command
</li>
</ol>
<div class="subtitle">4.2 A commented script</div>
<h2>4.2 A commented script</h2>
<p>
The following Gimp::Fu script example shows the steps described in the previous section.
It registeres a script that takes two values, the size of the image and a color, and then produces an image of the requested size with the requested color.
......@@ -293,7 +293,7 @@ They can be added to an image using the 'gimp_image_add_layer' command
Choosing the default values creates result like image above.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">5. Object oriented syntax</div>
<h2>5. Object oriented syntax</h2>
<p>
Gimp::Fu provides an alternative object-oriented syntax for the image and the drawable commands.
Here is a table showing the procedural vs the object oriented syntax for a few commands:
......@@ -313,7 +313,7 @@ They can be added to an image using the 'gimp_image_add_layer' command
Note that the object oriented syntax is only syntactic sugar that makes the calling syntax cleaner in some cases. The error messages are still given in the procedural format.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">6. Painting areas with selections</div>
<h2>6. Painting areas with selections</h2>
<p>
In the uni script the function gimp_edit_fill was called to fill the whole image. Looking at the info for gimp_edit_fill in the DB browser we find the following:
</p>
......@@ -436,7 +436,7 @@ exit main();
The result when run on our previous image.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">6.1 Complex selections</div>
<h2>6.1 Complex selections</h2>
<p>
Besides rectangular selections elliptical selections may also be created through the PDB functions
gimp_ellipse_select() and gimp_free_select() which allows the selection of ellipses and polygons.
......@@ -448,7 +448,7 @@ exit main();
Search for ``select'' in the DB Browser to see a list of all the selection related functions.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">6.2 Loops</div>
<h2>6.2 Loops</h2>
<p>
In perl it is trivial to write loops that together with the various selecton tools gives powerful creative possibilities.
Here is an example that mixes colors in circles. There is nothing really new here, but it shows the power of the what we have described above.
......@@ -503,7 +503,7 @@ exit main();
The result.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">7. Creating text, Hello World - writing text in an image</div>
<h2>7. Creating text, Hello World - writing text in an image</h2>
<p>
To create text the PDB function gimp_text_fontname() may be used. In this function the font is specified in the X11 font conventions.
(There are also some older functions, gimp_text and gimp_text_ext in which the different X11 fields are specified explicitely.)
......@@ -633,7 +633,7 @@ exit main();
The result shown in the dialog and the resulting image above.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">8. Floating selections</div>
<h2>8. Floating selections</h2>
<p>
When a region has been selected through one of the selection routines the area outlined by the selection may be copied to the cut-buffer through the gimp_edit_copy command.
The cut-buffer may subsequently be pasted into a different layer through the gimp_edit_paste command.
......@@ -694,7 +694,7 @@ register "horiz_cat", "Horizontal concat", "Horizontal Concat",
exit main();
</pre>
<div class="subtitle">9. The Perl Server and stand-alone scripts</div>
<h2>9. The Perl Server and stand-alone scripts</h2>
<p>
So far the scripts have all been started from the menu structure within menu. But there is another possibility and that is to run the scripts from the command line,
as a normal perl program. When run this way the script tries to connect to the Perl-Server, and if it fails it will launch gimp on its own.
......@@ -725,7 +725,7 @@ exit main();
<b>Note:</b>The image is saved to the directory where gimp was started from and not to the directory in which the scripts were invoked, unless a complete path is given!
</p>
<div class="subtitle">10. End notes</div>
<h2>10. End notes</h2>
<p>
This tutorial has covered only a small part of the possibilities available to a script writer.
In particular the following issues available to Gimp::Perl scripts have not been covered:
......
......@@ -2,9 +2,9 @@
<title>GIMP - Basic Scheme</title>
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-look-feel.xhtml" -->
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-tutorial-init.xhtml" -->
<div class="heading">Basic Scheme</div>
<h1>Basic Scheme</h1>
<div class="subtitle">Intention</div>
<h2>Intention</h2>
<p>
One of the wonderful features of GIMP is that it all its functionality may be accessed through scripting.
The major scripting language for the GIMP that has been attached to it today is Scheme.
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@
without getting into the programming language theory that is so typical of other Scheme references.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">1. Expressions</div>
<h2>1. Expressions</h2>
<p>
Scheme is a lisp variants and all expressions are surrounded by parens. E.g. a list which will calculate the sum of 3 and 4 is written
</p>
......@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@
</pre>
<br />
<div class="subtitle">2. Functions</div>
<h2>2. Functions</h2>
<p>
Aside from the four arithmetic functions that are represented through the symbols + - * / there are lots of other functions built into the language.
All of them have the form
......@@ -58,7 +58,7 @@
</pre>
<br />
<div class="subtitle">3. Variables and lists</div>
<h2>3. Variables and lists</h2>
<p>
Variables may be declared and set through the set! command. (These variables will be global but this should not bother the casual gimp programmer).
Here are a couple of assignments:
......@@ -86,7 +86,7 @@
</pre>
<br />
<div class="subtitle">3.1 car, cdr and friends (*)</div>
<h2>3.1 car, cdr and friends (*)</h2>
<p>
A list in Scheme is always composed of a head and a tail. The head is the first entry in the list, and the tail is the list of the rest of the elements.
This means that the list (255 127 63) really means (255 (127 (63 ()))) but Scheme allows the previous form as a shortcut.
......@@ -123,7 +123,7 @@
This is e.g. the case for the important functions gimp-new-image and gimp-new-layer used below.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">3.2 Local variables (*)</div>
<h2>3.2 Local variables (*)</h2>
<p>
More experienced scheme programmers mostly use local variables instead of the global variables described above.
This is considered better programming practice and this construct should be recognized in order to be able to read others ScriptFu scripts.
......@@ -139,7 +139,7 @@
Here a and b have a local scope and retain their values only up to the closing paren matching the one before let* .
</p>
<div class="subtitle">4. The GIMP PDB</div>
<h2>4. The GIMP PDB</h2>
<p>
All functionality of GIMP is available through the procedural database (PDB).
Each procedural database function has a corresponding scheme function mapping. E.g.
......@@ -161,7 +161,7 @@
The different types will be explained below.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">5. Registering the script with Script-Fu</div>
<h2>5. Registering the script with Script-Fu</h2>
<p>
After a function has been written it has to be registered with script-fu before it can be used.
This is done through the scheme function script-fu-register. The registering has following purposes:
......@@ -208,7 +208,7 @@
<li> A default value.</li>
</ol>
<div class="subtitle">6. A commented script</div>
<h2>6. A commented script</h2>
<p>
The following script <b>uni.scm</b> receives two parameter from the user, the size of the image, and a color and goes on to
produce a uniform image of the requested size and the requested color. Not very useful, but it shows the essential steps in producing a script-fu script.
......@@ -274,7 +274,7 @@
</pre>
<br />
<div class="subtitle">6.1 Hanging a script in the image menu</div>
<h2>6.1 Hanging a script in the image menu</h2>
<p>
In the <b>uni-img</b> script it was placed under <b>Xtns/...</b> in the main Gimp window. This is done to create a new image that is independant of earlier images.
It is also possible to create a script which works on an already existing image. If in <b>script-fu-register</b> as the second argument is written:
......@@ -325,7 +325,7 @@
</pre>
<br />
<div class="subtitle">7. Painting areas with selections</div>
<h2>7. Painting areas with selections</h2>
<p>
In uni-img we called the procedure gimp-edit-fill to fill the whole image. Looking at the info for gimp-edit-fill in the DB browser we find the following:
</p>
......@@ -438,7 +438,7 @@ The blur is a gaussian blur with the specified feather radius.
</pre>
<br />
<div class="subtitle">8. Loops</div>
<h2>8. Loops</h2>
<p>
The only looping construct that exists in Script-Fu is <b>while</b>
</p>
......@@ -465,14 +465,14 @@ The blur is a gaussian blur with the specified feather radius.
</pre>
<br />
<div class="subtitle">9. Floating selections</div>
<h2>9. Floating selections</h2>
<p>
When pasting an image from the clipboard, or when creating text in a a drawable, the result is not put directly in the drawable.
Instead it is put into a special temporary layer known as a floating selection. The floating selection may be manipulated in several ways,
and finally it is merged into its associated layer, a process known as anchoring.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">9.1 Hello World - writing text in an image</div>
<h2>9.1 Hello World - writing text in an image</h2>
<p>
When creating text through the gimp-text command, the text is always put into a temporary layer. This temporary layer then has to be anchored.
Here is an example of creating some text which is pasted into the current drawable:
......@@ -522,7 +522,7 @@ The blur is a gaussian blur with the specified feather radius.
All the commands between the commands gimp-undo-push-group-begin and gimp-undo-push-group-end are undone together if the undo command is issued.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">9.2 Copying a selection</div>
<h2>9.2 Copying a selection</h2>
<p>
To copy a selection, the command gimp-edit-copy is used. It places a copy of the selection contents in the cut-buffer.
The contents of the cut-buffer may then be pasted into a layer, the same layer or another one, and it is then pasted as a floating layer.
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......@@ -2,12 +2,12 @@
<title>GIMP - Basic Scheme2</title>
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-look-feel.xhtml" -->
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-tutorial-init.xhtml" -->
<div class="heading">Basic Scheme2</div>
<h1>Basic Scheme2</h1>
<p>
This article was originally published in <a href="http://www.linux-mag.com/2002-01/power_01.html">Linux Magazine, January 2002</a>.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Intention</div>
<h2>Intention</h2>
<p>
Unix (and by association, Linux) provides the user with an environment full of possibilities. To turn these possibilities into reality,
a Unix user must be technical in two senses of the word. Of course, he must understand <i>technology</i>, but to really shine,
......@@ -37,7 +37,7 @@
let's take a look at a very small subset of Scheme.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">A Crash Course in Scheme</div>
<h2>A Crash Course in Scheme</h2>
<p>
Scheme has a simple and uniform syntax compared to most other languages, but there's still no way to properly explain it in this limited space.
With that in mind, we'll cover the bare minimum of Scheme that you'll need to get started with GIMP scripting. Fortunately,
......@@ -112,7 +112,7 @@
so why not make the most of them? You can take a look at <i>Resources</i> for more information.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">The GIMP API</div>
<h2>The GIMP API</h2>
<p>
Now that we know a little Scheme, we can start taking a look at how it is applied to the GIMP.
</p>
......@@ -210,13 +210,13 @@
<i>Figure Two: A simple drawing.</i>
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Bigger and Better Things...</div>
<h2>Bigger and Better Things...</h2>
<p>
Now that we have a foundation of knowledge to work from, we can move on to more interesting topics. Study Scheme and the GIMP on your own.
See <i>Resources</i> for good places to start your self-education.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Resources</div>
<h2>Resources</h2>
<ul>
<li><a href="http://www.cs.rice.edu/~dorai/t-y-scheme/t-y-scheme-Z-H-1.html">Teach Yourself Scheme in Fixnum Days</a></li>
<li><a href="http://manual.gimp.org/manual/GUM/write_scriptfu3.html">Mike Terry's Black Belt School of Script-Fu</a></li>
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......@@ -2,9 +2,9 @@
<title>GIMP - Bezier Selections</title>
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-look-feel.xhtml" -->
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-tutorial-init.xhtml" -->
<div class="heading">Bezier Selections</div>
<h1>Bezier Selections</h1>
<div class="subtitle">Intention</div>
<h2>Intention</h2>
<p>
Bezier selection is a powerful tool in The Gimp. The rectangle- and ellipse-selections are not very flexible if you happen to need something more special.
And since many of us gimpers don't have a graphics tablet, it's not so easy to make the mouse pointer move the way you want. Bezier selection fixes the
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@
"Drawing Shapes with Bezier" for more information on this great tool.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">What is it?</div>
<h2>What is it?</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="bezier_box.gif" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@
Of course you can have as many points as you need.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Modifying the curves</div>
<h2>Modifying the curves</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="bezier_curve.gif" alt=""/>
</p>
......@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@
by dragging the handles around.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">A Few Tips</div>
<h2>A Few Tips</h2>
<ol>
<li>Always before modifying any points or handles, click the handle or a point to make it active</li>
<li>To move just one handle and leave the opposite side in its place, click on the handle to activate it and press shift while dragging it</li>
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......@@ -2,12 +2,12 @@
<title>GIMP - Blending Exposures</title>
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-look-feel.xhtml" -->
<!--#include virtual="/includes/wgo-tutorial-init.xhtml" -->
<div class="heading">Blending Exposures</div>
<h1>Blending Exposures</h1>
<p>
Text and images Copyright (C) 2002 <a href="mailto:eric@redskiesatnight.com">Eric R. Jeschke</a> and may not be used without permission of the author.
</p>
<div class="subtitle"></div>
<h2>Intention</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="before-light.jpg" alt=""/>
<img src="before-dark.jpg" alt=""/>
......@@ -30,13 +30,13 @@
photography web site (great web site BTW, I recommend it).
</p>
<div class="subtitle">The Procedure</div>
<h2>The Procedure</h2>
<p>
The basic technique is to create a layer above the image that contains the other exposure of the same scene. Finally, we apply a layer mask to the this
layer which makes parts of the image transparent that we want to show through from below.
</p>
<div class="subtitle">Step 1</div>
<h2>Step 1</h2>
<p class="images">
<img src="image-original-light.jpg" alt=""/>
<img src="image-original-dark.jpg" alt=""/>
......@@ -45,7 +45,7 @@
Here are the two exposures, loaded into the GIMP. I am going to sandwich these on different layers and then combine them with a layer mask.
</p>