Commit da55da07 authored by Dan Mueth's avatar Dan Mueth Committed by Dan Mueth

Adding this directory for the GNU FDL. This is a temporary solution. When

2001-01-24  Dan Mueth <dan@eazel.com>

        * user-guide/gnufdl: Adding this directory for the GNU FDL.
          This is a temporary solution.  When GNOME 1.4 is out, we
          will have gnome-core installing 'fdl' and we will point to
          that instead of 'gnufdl'.
        * user-guide/C/: Removing old docs stuff, and adding Vera's
          new docs.
parent 714a3185
2001-01-24 Dan Mueth <dan@eazel.com>
* user-guide/gnufdl: Adding this directory for the GNU FDL.
This is a temporary solution. When GNOME 1.4 is out, we
will have gnome-core installing 'fdl' and we will point to
that instead of 'gnufdl'.
* user-guide/C/: Removing old docs stuff, and adding Vera's
new docs.
Wed Jan 24 21:21:52 2001 George Lebl <jirka@5z.com>
Maciej (mjs@eazel.com) approved this, so blame him if this makes
......
......@@ -851,6 +851,7 @@ intl/Makefile
test/Makefile
user-guide/Makefile
user-guide/C/Makefile
user-guide/gnufdl/Makefile
applets/Makefile
applets/launcher/Makefile
applets/preferences-applet/Makefile
......
This diff is collapsed.
<chapter id="ch2">
<title>Customizing the Nautilus Interface</title>
<para>
Nautilus has been designed to be highly configurable,
both to suit the desire of users for customized decor,
and to suit the needs of users at
different levels of expertise.
</para>
<para>
Chapter two is presented in four sections:
<itemizedlist>
<listitem><para>
Choosing and Customizing User Settings
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>
Customizing File Layout and Icon Appearance
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>
Configuring Applications
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>
Customizing Nautilus Appearance
</para></listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</para>
<sect1 id="ch2-settings">
<title>Choosing and Customizing User Settings</title>
<para>
User settings
control performance and design variables, as well
as certain appearance variables that are related
more toward system function than simple decor.
</para>
<para>
There are three levels of user settings to choose
from: beginner, intermediate, and advanced; the
level of information displayed increasing with
each step. In addition, the two higher-level
settings are both highly customizable.
</para>
<sect2 id="ch2-settings-accessing">
<title>Accessing and Choosing User Settings</title>
<para>
To access user settings, click the colored icon on
the far right of the menu bar (Figure 1).
</para>
<figure>
<title>Accessing User Settings</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-ski-intermediate-menu" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
<para>
The drop-down menu presents the three levels of
choices, and the choice of customizing the inter-
mediate and advanced levels.
</para>
<para>
Figure 2 and 3 present the most obvious of the
differences between the default beginner or intermediate,
and the advanced display settings. In
both cases Nautilus is looking at the /home/john
directory. Home directories typically have a
number of hidden files. In Figure 2, at the
beginner (or intermediate) setting, only four
directories are visible. In Figure 3, at the
advanced setting, an additional 15 hidden directories
are visible.
</para>
<figure>
<title>Four Directories Visible at the Intermediate User Setting</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-photos-john" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
<figure>
<title>The Same Directory at the Advanced User Setting, Showing Fifteen
Hidden Files</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-john" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
</sect2>
<sect2 id="ch2-settings-editing">
<title>Editing User Settings</title>
<para>
The Edit Settings menu item, which is used to edit
the intermediate and advanced user levels,
presents the same choices for both. The choices
are listed under six headings:
<itemizedlist>
<listitem><para>
Folder Views
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>
Sidebar Panels
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>
Appearance
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>
Speed Trade-offs
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>
Search
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>
Navigation
</para></listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</para>
<para>
Figure 4 shows the choices in the first heading:
Folder Views. Here the user can choose to have
Nautilus open a file in a separate window, activate
items with a single or a double click, and display
hidden and backup files.
</para>
<figure>
<title>Customizing Directory Views</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-edit-settings-folder" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
<para>
The next heading down the list, Sidebar Panels,
lets the user choose which panels should appear in
the sidebar. Appearance, the third heading, allows
the user to choose between smoother (but
slower) graphics, or rough edges and speed. It
also allows a choice of fonts with which to
display file names and other information.
</para>
<para>
Search (Figure 5), lets users configure the file
manager to search for files by text only, or also by
their properties (slower), to optionally do slow,
complete searches, and to change, if desired,
Nautilus default web search location.
</para>
<para>
The Navigation heading allows the user to change
the local machines default home location, and
also allows the user to setup an HTTP proxy.
</para>
<figure>
<title>Customizing Search Features: Complexity, Speed and Location</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-search-settings" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
</sect2>
</sect1>
<sect1 id="ch2-file">
<title>Customizing File Layout and Icon Appearance</title>
<para>
The layout of files in the main window can be a
major factor in the ease and speed of file identification.
The default method of laying out files,
alphabetically according to file names, is appropriate
under certain conditions, i.e.: when the
files in a directory are all of a similar type, with
well designed names following a similar pattern.
However, file identification using this layout can
be tedious and difficult in a directory holding
large numbers of files of disparate types, and
without an obvious naming convention.
</para>
<sect2 id="ch2-file-layout">
<title>Choices in File Layout</title>
<para>
Nautilus addresses this issue by giving the user
several choices of file layout. Figure 6 shows the
Lay out items pull-down sub-menu (under View), the
range of layout choices available, and a directory
with several different file types arranged alpha-
betically.
</para>
<figure>
<title>Layout Choices, and an Unoptimized Alphabetical Layout</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-view-layout-menu" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
<para>In this example, a more sensible layout would be
by type. The result of this choice of layout
is shown in Figure 7.
</para>
<figure>
<title>A More Logical Layout, by Type</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-home-john-mydoc" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
<para>
Once a method of layout is chosen, the presentation
can be further optimized with the Use
Tighter Layout and Reversed Order options.
</para>
</sect2>
<sect2 id="ch2-file-icons">
<title>Customizing Icon Captions</title>
<para>
Icon captions and appearance can also be
adjusted. A file caption must always start with the
file name; however, both the type of information
and the order of information displayed beneath
file names can be manipulated.
</para>
<para>
The Icon Captions menu item is found under Edit
on the tool bar. When clicked, it displays the Icon
Captions menu, Figure 8.
</para>
<figure>
<title>Determining the Order of Icon Information</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-icon-captions-alone" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
<para>
The three menu-buttons reflect the order of information
displayed in the icon caption. Each button
displays identical information, from file size to
MIME type, ten types of information in all. The
type chosen by the top button will appear first,
beneath the file name, the type chosen by the
second will appear next, etc. Figure 9 shows an
enlarged file image (to 400%), with the captioned
information reflecting the order in the accompanying
Icon Caption sub-menu.
</para>
<figure>
<title>Size, Date Modified, Type</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-icon-captions" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
</sect2>
<sect2 id="ch2-file-diff">
<title>Differentiating a Directory with a Customized Icon</title>
<para>
The actual appearance of an icon can be replaced
by another useful if, for instance, you want to
identify a certain directory by the type of files it
contains. The method used is to drag and drop the
icon in the main window which you want for a
replacement, to the icon in the sidebar that you
want to replace. An example can be seen in Figure
10, where an icon representing a portrait of
Beethoven has been used to identify the music
directory.
</para>
<figure>
<title>Identifying a Folder with Another Files Icon</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-music" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
</sect2>
<sect2 id="ch2-file-emblems">
<title>Adding Emblems</title>
<para>
Icon appearance can also be enhanced by the use
of emblems. Click on a file with the right mouse
button, and choose Show Properties. In the
resulting properties window, click the middle tab,
Emblems. Any and all of the emblems may be
added to a files iconic appearance. In the
example shown in Figure 11, the Draft emblem
has been added to a text file.
</para>
<figure>
<title>Adding an Emblem to an Icon</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-emblems" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
</sect2>
</sect1>
<sect1 id="ch2-configuring">
<title>Configuring Applications</title>
<para>
As we have seen in Chapter One, a file can easily
be opened by its application from within Nautilus,
relieving the user of the tedious extra steps of
first starting the application, then finding the
desired file. Nautilus does this by assigning
certain adefault applications to certain file types.
This too is customizable by the user.
</para>
<para>
Clicking on a file--in the example below, a JPEG
file--with the right mouse button, brings up a
menu with the item, Open With. Moving the
mouse pointer to this opens a sub-menu (Figure 12).
</para>
<figure>
<title>The Open With Sub-Menu</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-right-click-open-with" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
<para>
In this example, Nautilus offers to open the file
with its default image viewer, or the user can
choose another viewer or application.
</para>
<para>
Suppose the user wanted to customize Nautilus to
always open JPEG files with The Gimp (which is
both a viewer and an editor). In this case, the user
would click Other Application.
</para>
<para>
The Open with Other window which appears
(Figure 13), shows the user the current application(s)
setup for opening files.
</para>
<figure>
<title>Choosing an Application</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-open-with-other" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
<para>
In Figure 13, The Gimp is present, but is not in
the menu for opening JPEG files. To place it in
the menu and make sure it is used as the default
viewer for JPEG files, click the Modify button,
and choose the second selection (Figure 14).
</para>
<figure>
<title>Modifying the Default Application for Opening a File</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-open-with" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
<para>
A deeper level of configuration can be obtained
by clicking the Go There button on the Open with
Other menu. That opens the GNOME Control
Center to the File Types and Programs screen. For
an explanation of how to associate programs with
certain file types, see the GNOME Users Guide.
</para>
</sect1>
<sect1 id="ch2-apearance">
<title>Customizing Nautilus Appearance</title>
<para>
Many users are not content to stare at a <emphasis>default</emphasis>
desktop decor: they want to customize it
according to taste. For this, a wide range of
backgrounds, colors, emblems and themes is
available, and, should the user wish, they can add
their own.
</para>
<sect2 id="ch2-apearance-colors">
<title>Backgrounds, Colors and Emblems</title>
<para>
To change the desktop decor, click on Edit on the
menu bar, and choose Customize. The Nautilus
Customization Options window appears.
</para>
<para>
Each background, color, and emblem can be
applied by simply dragging it to the desire
window or file with the mouse. In the example in
Figure 15, the satin background has been applied
to the main window, while the color ruby has been
dragged and dropped into the sidebar. Finally, the
file <filename>pluck.wav</filename> has been embelished with a
green, heart-shaped <emphasis>Favorite</emphasis> emblem.
</para>
<figure>
<title>Color and Textures to the Users Taste</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-colors" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
</sect2>
<sect2 id="ch2-apearance-themes">
<title>Themes</title>
<para>
The simplest way to change an overall <emphasis>look</emphasis>, is
to change the theme. Several themes are
available; clicking on Change Appearance in the
Edit menu brings up the Nautilus Theme Selector.
</para>
<para>
Selecting one of the four different themes applies
the new theme while the selector window is still
open, allowing the user to preview the new
design. In Figure 16, the Eazel theme has been
selected, changing backgrounds on the sidebar
and the main window, and also the icons on the
tool bar.
</para>
<figure>
<title>The <emphasis>Eazel</emphasis> Theme, with the Nautilus Theme Selector
Window</title>
<graphic fileref="ch2-theme-eazel" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
</sect2>
</sect1>
</chapter>
<chapter id="ch3">
<title>Nautilus and Eazel Services</title>
<para>
Eazel Services are an Internet-based suite of tools
designed to simplify system management in
Linux. Nautilus and Eazel Services work together:
one complements the other. This chapter presents
a description of Eazel Services available for
the preview release two.
</para>
<para>
For this release, Services will include:
<itemizedlist>
<listitem><para>
Eazel Software Catalog
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>
Eazel Software Installer
</para></listitem>
<listitem><para>
Eazel Online Storage
</para></listitem>
</itemizedlist>
</para>
<sect1 id="ch3-accessing">
<title>Accessing Services</title>
<para>
There are several ways to access Eazel Services.
When starting Nautilus for the first time, the user
is asked if they wish to learn about, sign up, or
log on to Services (Figure 1).
</para>
<figure>
<title>Signing Up for Eazel Services Upon Starting Nautilus</title>
<graphic fileref="ch3-sign-up" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
<para>
On a routine basis, Services can be reached by
simply clicking the Services icon on the Nautilus
toolbar. Alternatively, they can be reached
through any web browser, from www.eazel.com.
</para>
</sect1>
<sect1 id="ch3-registration">
<title>Registration and Login</title>
<para>
Registration--for this preview release--is not required for the
software catalog, but is for online storage.
</para
<para>
Registration is the same from Nautilus or from any browser. The
screen is divided into three sections: the required fields to open
an account (Figure 2); the optional personal profile section, and
the optional computing environment section.
</para>
<figure>
<title>Required Account Information in Registration</title>
<graphic fileref="ch3-account-info" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
<para>
The user completes the process by activating their account with the
instructions sent in a validation e-mail. The instructions are sent
almost instantaneously.
</para>
<para>
Logging in can be accomplished either from the greeting page which
follows account validation, from clicking services in Nautilus, or
from the Eazel website, www.eazel.com.
</para>
<para>
The Welcome screen, Figure 3, is organized into three basic sections.
The top section has links for reaching the Eazel support page, for
changing user preferences, and for logging out.
</para>
<para>
The support page has a number of FAQs and other help features. The
preferences link allows the user to change or update personal and
computer preferences, and even passwords.
</para/>
<figure>
<title>The Welcome Screen, Showing Online Storage and Software Catalog
</title>
<graphic fileref="ch3-welcome-screen" scale="50"></graphic>
</figure>
<para>