Commit 4a6a72fe authored by BST 1998  Tony Gale's avatar BST 1998 Tony Gale Committed by Tony Gale

- GtkTooltips, update to current API - change all 'gpointer *data' to

Sun May 24 12:11:38 BST 1998  Tony Gale  <gale@gtk.org>

        * docs/gtk_tut.sgml:
           - GtkTooltips, update to current API
           - change all 'gpointer *data' to 'gpointer data'
           - other minor changes
parent 23919bb0
Sun May 24 12:11:38 BST 1998 Tony Gale <gale@gtk.org>
* docs/gtk_tut.sgml:
- GtkTooltips, update to current API
- change all 'gpointer *data' to 'gpointer data'
- other minor changes
Sat May 23 21:54:05 1998 Owen Taylor <otaylor@gtk.org>
* configure.in (LDFLAGS): Bombo out with a moderately
......
Sun May 24 12:11:38 BST 1998 Tony Gale <gale@gtk.org>
* docs/gtk_tut.sgml:
- GtkTooltips, update to current API
- change all 'gpointer *data' to 'gpointer data'
- other minor changes
Sat May 23 21:54:05 1998 Owen Taylor <otaylor@gtk.org>
* configure.in (LDFLAGS): Bombo out with a moderately
......
Sun May 24 12:11:38 BST 1998 Tony Gale <gale@gtk.org>
* docs/gtk_tut.sgml:
- GtkTooltips, update to current API
- change all 'gpointer *data' to 'gpointer data'
- other minor changes
Sat May 23 21:54:05 1998 Owen Taylor <otaylor@gtk.org>
* configure.in (LDFLAGS): Bombo out with a moderately
......
Sun May 24 12:11:38 BST 1998 Tony Gale <gale@gtk.org>
* docs/gtk_tut.sgml:
- GtkTooltips, update to current API
- change all 'gpointer *data' to 'gpointer data'
- other minor changes
Sat May 23 21:54:05 1998 Owen Taylor <otaylor@gtk.org>
* configure.in (LDFLAGS): Bombo out with a moderately
......
Sun May 24 12:11:38 BST 1998 Tony Gale <gale@gtk.org>
* docs/gtk_tut.sgml:
- GtkTooltips, update to current API
- change all 'gpointer *data' to 'gpointer data'
- other minor changes
Sat May 23 21:54:05 1998 Owen Taylor <otaylor@gtk.org>
* configure.in (LDFLAGS): Bombo out with a moderately
......
Sun May 24 12:11:38 BST 1998 Tony Gale <gale@gtk.org>
* docs/gtk_tut.sgml:
- GtkTooltips, update to current API
- change all 'gpointer *data' to 'gpointer data'
- other minor changes
Sat May 23 21:54:05 1998 Owen Taylor <otaylor@gtk.org>
* configure.in (LDFLAGS): Bombo out with a moderately
......
Sun May 24 12:11:38 BST 1998 Tony Gale <gale@gtk.org>
* docs/gtk_tut.sgml:
- GtkTooltips, update to current API
- change all 'gpointer *data' to 'gpointer data'
- other minor changes
Sat May 23 21:54:05 1998 Owen Taylor <otaylor@gtk.org>
* configure.in (LDFLAGS): Bombo out with a moderately
......
......@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@
name="&lt;imain@gtk.org&gt;"></tt>,
Tony Gale <tt><htmlurl url="mailto:gale@gtk.org"
name="&lt;gale@gtk.org&gt;"></tt>
<date>April 6th, 1998
<date>May 24th, 1998
<!-- ***************************************************************** -->
<sect>Introduction
......@@ -319,7 +319,7 @@ The function specified in the third argument is called a "callback
function", and should be of the form:
<tscreen><verb>
void callback_func(GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *callback_data);
void callback_func(GtkWidget *widget, gpointer callback_data);
</verb></tscreen>
<p>
Where the first argument will be a pointer to the widget that emitted the signal, and
......@@ -368,7 +368,7 @@ is not hard to do things with them. The next example will use the data
argument to tell us which button was pressed.
<tscreen><verb>
void hello (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void hello (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
g_print ("Hello World\n");
}
......@@ -401,7 +401,7 @@ gtk_main_quit(). This function tells GTK that it is to exit from gtk_main
when control is returned to it.
<tscreen><verb>
void destroy (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void destroy (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -618,13 +618,13 @@ widgets.
/* Our new improved callback. The data passed to this function is printed
* to stdout. */
void callback (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void callback (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
g_print ("Hello again - %s was pressed\n", (char *) data);
}
/* another callback */
void delete_event (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void delete_event (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -846,7 +846,7 @@ and play with it.
#include "gtk/gtk.h"
void
delete_event (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
delete_event (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -1286,13 +1286,13 @@ Here's the source code:
/* our callback.
* the data passed to this function is printed to stdout */
void callback (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void callback (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
g_print ("Hello again - %s was pressed\n", (char *) data);
}
/* this callback quits the program */
void delete_event (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void delete_event (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -1635,7 +1635,7 @@ GtkWidget *xpm_label_box (GtkWidget *parent, gchar *xpm_filename, gchar *label_t
}
/* our usual callback function */
void callback (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void callback (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
g_print ("Hello again - %s was pressed\n", (char *) data);
}
......@@ -1857,7 +1857,7 @@ The following example creates a radio button group with three buttons.
#include <gtk/gtk.h>
#include <glib.h>
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data ) {
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data ) {
gtk_main_quit();
}
......@@ -1989,8 +1989,8 @@ code, take a look at the testgtk.c program distributed with GDK.
Some widgets (such as the label) will not work with tooltips.
<p>
The first call you will use to create a new tooltip. You only need to do
this once in a given function. The GtkTooltip this function returns can be
used to create multiple tooltips.
this once in a given function. The <tt/GtkTooltip/ this function
returns can be used to create multiple tooltips.
<tscreen><verb>
GtkTooltips *gtk_tooltips_new (void);
......@@ -2000,14 +2000,15 @@ Once you have created a new tooltip, and the widget you wish to use it on,
simply use this call to set it.
<tscreen><verb>
void gtk_tooltips_set_tips (GtkTooltips *tooltips,
GtkWidget *widget,
gchar *tips_text);
void gtk_tooltips_set_tip (GtkTooltips *tooltips,
GtkWidget *widget,
const gchar *tip_text,
const gchar *tip_private);
</verb></tscreen>
The first argument is the tooltip you've already created, followed by the
widget you wish to have this tooltip pop up for, and the text you wish it to
say.
say. The last argument can be set to NULL.
<p>
Here's a short example:
......@@ -2018,10 +2019,9 @@ GtkWidget *button;
tooltips = gtk_tooltips_new ();
button = gtk_button_new_with_label ("button 1");
...
gtk_tooltips_set_tips (tooltips, button, "This is button 1");
gtk_tooltips_set_tip (tooltips, button, "This is button 1", NULL);
</verb></tscreen>
There are other calls used with tooltips. I will just list them with a
brief description of what they do.
......@@ -2134,7 +2134,7 @@ void progress_r (void)
pstat = FALSE;
}
void destroy (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void destroy (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -2255,7 +2255,7 @@ GtkWidget* gtk_dialog_new (void);
So to create a new dialog box, use,
<tscreen><verb>
GtkWidget window;
GtkWidget *window;
window = gtk_dialog_new ();
</verb></tscreen>
......@@ -2440,14 +2440,14 @@ static const char * xpm_data[] = {
/* when invoked (via signal delete_event), terminates the application.
*/
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data ) {
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data ) {
gtk_main_quit();
}
/* is invoked when the button is clicked. It just prints a message.
*/
void button_clicked( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data ) {
void button_clicked( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data ) {
printf( "button clicked\n" );
}
......@@ -2648,7 +2648,7 @@ static char * WheelbarrowFull_xpm[] = {
/* when invoked (via signal delete_event), terminates the application.
*/
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data ) {
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data ) {
gtk_main_quit();
}
......@@ -2808,7 +2808,7 @@ Placement of the drawing area and the rulers are done using a table.
/* this routine gets control when the close button is clicked
*/
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data ) {
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data ) {
gtk_main_quit();
}
......@@ -2927,7 +2927,7 @@ onto the statusbar, and one for popping the last item back off.
GtkWidget *status_bar;
void push_item (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void push_item (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
static int count = 1;
char buff[20];
......@@ -2938,7 +2938,7 @@ void push_item (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
return;
}
void pop_item (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void pop_item (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_statusbar_pop( GTK_STATUSBAR(status_bar), (guint) &amp;data );
return;
......@@ -3448,7 +3448,7 @@ void file_ok_sel (GtkWidget *w, GtkFileSelection *fs)
g_print ("%s\n", gtk_file_selection_get_filename (GTK_FILE_SELECTION (fs)));
}
void destroy (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void destroy (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -3642,7 +3642,7 @@ void remove_book (GtkButton *button, GtkNotebook *notebook)
gtk_widget_draw(GTK_WIDGET(notebook), NULL);
}
void delete (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void delete (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -3825,7 +3825,7 @@ I've only commented on the parts that may be new to you.
#include <gtk/gtk.h>
void destroy(GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void destroy(GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit();
}
......@@ -4938,7 +4938,7 @@ void gtk_menu_bar_append( GtkMenuBar *menu_bar, GtkWidget *menu_item);
which in our case looks like this:
<tscreen><verb>
gtk_menu_bar_append( menu_bar, file_item );
gtk_menu_bar_append( GTK_MENU_BAR (menu_bar), file_item );
</verb></tscreen>
If we wanted the menu right justified on the menubar, such as help menus often are, we can
......@@ -5634,7 +5634,7 @@ These all require authors! :) Please consider contributing to our tutorial.
If you must use one of these widgets that are undocumented, I strongly
suggest you take a look at their respective header files in the GTK distro.
GTK's function names are very descriptive. Once you have an understanding
of how things work, it's not easy to figure out how to use a widget simply
of how things work, it's not difficult to figure out how to use a widget simply
by looking at it's function declarations. This, along with a few examples
from others' code, and it should be no problem.
......
......@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@
name="&lt;imain@gtk.org&gt;"></tt>,
Tony Gale <tt><htmlurl url="mailto:gale@gtk.org"
name="&lt;gale@gtk.org&gt;"></tt>
<date>April 6th, 1998
<date>May 24th, 1998
<!-- ***************************************************************** -->
<sect>Introduction
......@@ -319,7 +319,7 @@ The function specified in the third argument is called a "callback
function", and should be of the form:
<tscreen><verb>
void callback_func(GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *callback_data);
void callback_func(GtkWidget *widget, gpointer callback_data);
</verb></tscreen>
<p>
Where the first argument will be a pointer to the widget that emitted the signal, and
......@@ -368,7 +368,7 @@ is not hard to do things with them. The next example will use the data
argument to tell us which button was pressed.
<tscreen><verb>
void hello (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void hello (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
g_print ("Hello World\n");
}
......@@ -401,7 +401,7 @@ gtk_main_quit(). This function tells GTK that it is to exit from gtk_main
when control is returned to it.
<tscreen><verb>
void destroy (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void destroy (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -618,13 +618,13 @@ widgets.
/* Our new improved callback. The data passed to this function is printed
* to stdout. */
void callback (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void callback (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
g_print ("Hello again - %s was pressed\n", (char *) data);
}
/* another callback */
void delete_event (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void delete_event (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -846,7 +846,7 @@ and play with it.
#include "gtk/gtk.h"
void
delete_event (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
delete_event (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -1286,13 +1286,13 @@ Here's the source code:
/* our callback.
* the data passed to this function is printed to stdout */
void callback (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void callback (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
g_print ("Hello again - %s was pressed\n", (char *) data);
}
/* this callback quits the program */
void delete_event (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void delete_event (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -1635,7 +1635,7 @@ GtkWidget *xpm_label_box (GtkWidget *parent, gchar *xpm_filename, gchar *label_t
}
/* our usual callback function */
void callback (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void callback (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
g_print ("Hello again - %s was pressed\n", (char *) data);
}
......@@ -1857,7 +1857,7 @@ The following example creates a radio button group with three buttons.
#include <gtk/gtk.h>
#include <glib.h>
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data ) {
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data ) {
gtk_main_quit();
}
......@@ -1989,8 +1989,8 @@ code, take a look at the testgtk.c program distributed with GDK.
Some widgets (such as the label) will not work with tooltips.
<p>
The first call you will use to create a new tooltip. You only need to do
this once in a given function. The GtkTooltip this function returns can be
used to create multiple tooltips.
this once in a given function. The <tt/GtkTooltip/ this function
returns can be used to create multiple tooltips.
<tscreen><verb>
GtkTooltips *gtk_tooltips_new (void);
......@@ -2000,14 +2000,15 @@ Once you have created a new tooltip, and the widget you wish to use it on,
simply use this call to set it.
<tscreen><verb>
void gtk_tooltips_set_tips (GtkTooltips *tooltips,
GtkWidget *widget,
gchar *tips_text);
void gtk_tooltips_set_tip (GtkTooltips *tooltips,
GtkWidget *widget,
const gchar *tip_text,
const gchar *tip_private);
</verb></tscreen>
The first argument is the tooltip you've already created, followed by the
widget you wish to have this tooltip pop up for, and the text you wish it to
say.
say. The last argument can be set to NULL.
<p>
Here's a short example:
......@@ -2018,10 +2019,9 @@ GtkWidget *button;
tooltips = gtk_tooltips_new ();
button = gtk_button_new_with_label ("button 1");
...
gtk_tooltips_set_tips (tooltips, button, "This is button 1");
gtk_tooltips_set_tip (tooltips, button, "This is button 1", NULL);
</verb></tscreen>
There are other calls used with tooltips. I will just list them with a
brief description of what they do.
......@@ -2134,7 +2134,7 @@ void progress_r (void)
pstat = FALSE;
}
void destroy (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void destroy (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -2255,7 +2255,7 @@ GtkWidget* gtk_dialog_new (void);
So to create a new dialog box, use,
<tscreen><verb>
GtkWidget window;
GtkWidget *window;
window = gtk_dialog_new ();
</verb></tscreen>
......@@ -2440,14 +2440,14 @@ static const char * xpm_data[] = {
/* when invoked (via signal delete_event), terminates the application.
*/
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data ) {
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data ) {
gtk_main_quit();
}
/* is invoked when the button is clicked. It just prints a message.
*/
void button_clicked( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data ) {
void button_clicked( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data ) {
printf( "button clicked\n" );
}
......@@ -2648,7 +2648,7 @@ static char * WheelbarrowFull_xpm[] = {
/* when invoked (via signal delete_event), terminates the application.
*/
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data ) {
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data ) {
gtk_main_quit();
}
......@@ -2808,7 +2808,7 @@ Placement of the drawing area and the rulers are done using a table.
/* this routine gets control when the close button is clicked
*/
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data ) {
void close_application( GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data ) {
gtk_main_quit();
}
......@@ -2927,7 +2927,7 @@ onto the statusbar, and one for popping the last item back off.
GtkWidget *status_bar;
void push_item (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void push_item (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
static int count = 1;
char buff[20];
......@@ -2938,7 +2938,7 @@ void push_item (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
return;
}
void pop_item (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void pop_item (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_statusbar_pop( GTK_STATUSBAR(status_bar), (guint) &amp;data );
return;
......@@ -3448,7 +3448,7 @@ void file_ok_sel (GtkWidget *w, GtkFileSelection *fs)
g_print ("%s\n", gtk_file_selection_get_filename (GTK_FILE_SELECTION (fs)));
}
void destroy (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void destroy (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -3642,7 +3642,7 @@ void remove_book (GtkButton *button, GtkNotebook *notebook)
gtk_widget_draw(GTK_WIDGET(notebook), NULL);
}
void delete (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void delete (GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit ();
}
......@@ -3825,7 +3825,7 @@ I've only commented on the parts that may be new to you.
#include <gtk/gtk.h>
void destroy(GtkWidget *widget, gpointer *data)
void destroy(GtkWidget *widget, gpointer data)
{
gtk_main_quit();
}
......@@ -4938,7 +4938,7 @@ void gtk_menu_bar_append( GtkMenuBar *menu_bar, GtkWidget *menu_item);
which in our case looks like this:
<tscreen><verb>
gtk_menu_bar_append( menu_bar, file_item );
gtk_menu_bar_append( GTK_MENU_BAR (menu_bar), file_item );
</verb></tscreen>
If we wanted the menu right justified on the menubar, such as help menus often are, we can
......@@ -5634,7 +5634,7 @@ These all require authors! :) Please consider contributing to our tutorial.
If you must use one of these widgets that are undocumented, I strongly
suggest you take a look at their respective header files in the GTK distro.
GTK's function names are very descriptive. Once you have an understanding
of how things work, it's not easy to figure out how to use a widget simply
of how things work, it's not difficult to figure out how to use a widget simply
by looking at it's function declarations. This, along with a few examples
from others' code, and it should be no problem.
......
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