Commit 73826fc9 authored by Cody Russell's avatar Cody Russell

Much expanded overview docs for GtkTreeView and related objects.

parent 0c0f76ff
2002-03-20 Cody Russell <cody@jhu.edu>
* gtk/tree_widget.sgml: Much expanded overview of the tree.
Tue Mar 12 00:29:31 2002 Jonathan Blandford <jrb@redhat.com>
* gtk/question_index.sgml: new FAQ.
......
<refentry id="TreeWidget" revision="30 Oct 2000">
<refentry id="TreeWidget" revision="20 Mar 2002">
<refmeta>
<refentrytitle>Tree and List Widget Overview</refentrytitle>
<manvolnum>3</manvolnum>
......@@ -38,7 +38,204 @@
created to display various parts of the file system, but only one
copy need be kept in memory.
</para>
<para>
The purpose of the cell renderers is to provide extensibility to the
widget and to allow multiple ways of rendering the same type of data.
For example, consider how to render a boolean variable. Should you
render it as a string of "True" or "False", "On" or "Off", or should
you render it as a checkbox?
</para>
</refsect1>
<refsect1>
<title>Creating a model</title>
<para>
GTK+ 2.0 provides two types of models that can be used:
<link linkend="GtkListStore">GtkListStore</link> and
<link linkend="GtkTreeStore">GtkTreeStore</link>. GtkListStore is
used to model columned list widgets, while GtkTreeStore models
columned tree widgets. It is possible to develop a new type of model,
but the existing models should be satisfactory for all but the most
specialized of situations. Creating the model is quite simple:
</para>
<informalexample><programlisting><![CDATA[
GtkListStore *store = gtk_list_store_new (2, G_TYPE_STRING, G_TYPE_BOOLEAN);
]]></programlisting></informalexample>
<para>
This creates a list store with two columns: a string column and a boolean
column. Typically the 2 is never passed directly like that; usually an
enum is created wherein the different columns are enumerated, followed by
a token that represents the total number of columns. The next example will
illustrate this, only using a tree store instead of a list store. Creating
a tree store operates almost exactly the same.
</para>
<informalexample><programlisting><![CDATA[
enum
{
TITLE_COLUMN,
AUTHOR_COLUMN,
CHECKED_COLUMN,
N_COLUMNS
};
GtkTreeStore *store = gtk_tree_store_new (N_COLUMNS, /* Total number of columns */
G_TYPE_STRING, /* Book title */
G_TYPE_STRING, /* Author */
G_TYPE_BOOLEAN); /* Is checked out? */
]]></programlisting</informalexample>
<para>
Adding data to the model is done using <link linkend="gtk_tree_store_set">
gtk_tree_store_set()</link> or <link linkend="gtk_list_store_set">
gtk_list_store_set()</link>, depending upon which sort of model was
created. To do this, a <link linkend="GtkTreeIter">GtkTreeIter</link> must
be acquired. The iterator points to the location where data will be added.
</para>
<para>
Once an iterator has been acquired, <link linkend="gtk_tree_store_set">
gtk_tree_store_set()</link> is used to apply data to the part of the model
that the iterator points to. Consider the following example:
</para>
<informalexample><programlisting><![CDATA[
GtkTreeIter iter;
gtk_tree_store_append (store, &iter, NULL); /* Acquire an iterator */
gtk_tree_store_set (store, &iter,
TITLE_COLUMN, "The Principle of Reason",
AUTHOR_COLUMN, "Martin Heidegger",
CHECKED_COLUMN, FALSE);
]]></programlisting></informalexample>
<para>
Notice that the last argument is FALSE. This is always done because
this is a variable-argument function and it needs to know when to stop
processing arguments. It can be used to set the data in any or all
columns in a given row.
</para>
<para>
The third argument to gtk_tree_store_append() is the parent iterator. It
is used to add a row to a GtkTreeStore as a child of an existing row. This
means that the new row will only be visible when its parent is visible and
in its expanded state. Consider the following example:
</para>
<informalexample><programlisting><![CDATA[
GtkTreeIter iter1; /* Parent iter */
GtkTreeIter iter2; /* Child iter */
gtk_tree_store_append (store, &iter1, NULL); /* Acquire a top-level iterator */
gtk_tree_store_set (store, &iter1,
TITLE_COLUMN, "The Art of Computer Programming",
AUTHOR_COLUMN, "Donald E. Knuth",
CHECKED_COLUMN, FALSE,
NULL);
gtk_tree_store_append (store, &iter2, &iter1); /* Acquire a child iterator */
gtk_tree_store_set (store, &iter2,
TITLE_COLUMN, "Volume 1: Fundamental Algorithms",
NULL);
gtk_tree_store_append (store, &iter2, &iter1);
gtk_tree_store_set (store, &iter2,
TITLE_COLUMN, "Volume 2: Seminumerical Algorithms",
NULL);
gtk_tree_store_append (store, &iter2, &iter1);
gtk_tree_store_set (store, &iter2,
TITLE_COLUMN, "Volume 3: Sorting and Searching",
NULL);
]]></programlisting></informalexample>
</refsect1>
<refsect1>
<title>Creating the view component</title>
<para>
While there are two different models to choose from, there is only one
view widget to deal with. It works with either the list or the tree store.
Setting up a <link linkend="GtkTreeView">GtkTreeView</link> is not a
difficult matter. It needs a <link linkend="GtkTreeModel">GtkTreeModel</link>
to know where to retrieve its data from.
</para>
<informalexample><programlisting><![CDATA[
GtkWidget *tree;
tree = gtk_tree_view_new_with_model (GTK_TREE_MODEL (store));
]]></programlisting></informalexample>
<refsect2>
<title>Columns and cell renderers</title>
<para>
Cell renderers are used to draw the data in the tree model in a certain way.
There are three cell renderers to choose from with GTK+ 2.0, but the
adventuresome hacker may write more.
</para>
<informalexample><programlisting><![CDATA[
GtkCellRenderer *renderer;
GtkTreeViewColumn *column;
renderer = gtk_cell_renderer_text_new ();
column = gtk_tree_view_column_new_with_attributes ("Author",
renderer,
"text", AUTHOR_COLUMN,
NULL);
gtk_tree_view_append_column (GTK_TREE_VIEW (tree), column);
]]></programlisting></informalexample>
<para>
A <link linkend="GtkTreeViewColumn">GtkTreeViewColumn</link> is the
object that GtkTreeView uses to organize the vertical columns in
the tree view. It needs to know the name of the column to label
for the user, what type of cell renderer to use, and which piece of
data to retrieve from the model for a given row.
</para>
<para>
At this point, all the steps in creating a displayable tree have been
covered. The model is created, data is stored in it, a tree view is
created and columns are added to it.
</para>
</refsect2>
<refsect2>
<title>Selection handling</title>
<para>
Most applications will need to not only deal with displaying data, but also
receiving input events from users. To do this, simply get a reference to
a selection object and connect to the "changed" signal.
</para>
<informalexample><programlisting><![CDATA[
/* Prototype for selection handler callback */
static void tree_selection_changed_cb (GtkTreeSelection *selection, gpointer data);
/* Setup the selection handler */
GtkTreeSelection *select;
select = gtk_tree_view_get_selection (GTK_TREE_VIEW (tree));
gtk_tree_selection_set_mode (select, GTK_SELECT_SINGLE);
g_signal_connect (G_OBJECT (select), "changed",
G_CALLBACK (tree_selection_changed_cb),
NULL);
]]></programlisting></informalexample>
<para>
Then to retrieve data for the row selected:
</para>
<informalexample><programlisting><![CDATA[
static void
tree_selection_changed_cb (GtkTreeSelection *selection, gpointer data)
{
GtkTreeIter iter;
GtkTreeModel *model;
gchar *author;
if (gtk_tree_selection_get_selected (selection, &model, &iter))
{
gtk_tree_model_get (model, &iter, AUTHOR_COLUMN, &author, -1);
g_print ("You selected a book by %s\n", author);
g_free (author);
}
}
]]></programlisting></informalexample>
</refsect2>
</refsect1>
<refsect1>
<title>Simple Example</title>
<para>
......@@ -52,47 +249,70 @@
<informalexample><programlisting><![CDATA[
enum
{
COLUMN_ONE,
N_COLUMNS
TITLE_COLUMN,
AUTHOR_COLUMN,
CHECKED_COLUMN,
N_COLUMNS
};
void
setup_tree (void)
{
GtkTreeStore *model;
GtkWidget *view;
GtkTreeViewColumn *column;
GtkCellRenderer *cell_renderer;
/* Create a model. We are using the store model for now, though we
* could use any other GtkTreeModel */
model = gtk_tree_store_new (N_COLUMNS, G_TYPE_STRING);
/* custom function to fill the model with data */
populate_tree_model (model);
/* Create a view */
view = gtk_tree_view_new_with_model (GTK_TREE_MODEL (model));
/* The view now holds a reference. We can get rid of our own
* reference */
g_object_unref (G_OBJECT (model));
/* Create a cell render and arbitrarily make it red for demonstration
* purposes */
cell_renderer = gtk_cell_renderer_text_new ();
g_object_set (G_OBJECT (cell_renderer), "foreground", "red", NULL);
/* Create a column, associating the "text" attribute of the
* cell_renderer to the first column of the model */
column = gtk_tree_view_column_new_with_attributes ("title",
cell_renderer,
"text", COLUMN_ONE,
NULL);
/* Add the column to the view. */
gtk_tree_view_append_column (GTK_TREE_VIEW (view), column);
/* Now we can manipulate the view just like any other GTK widget */
...
GtkTreeStore *store;
GtkWidget *tree;
GtkTreeViewColumn *column;
GtkCellRenderer *renderer;
/* Create a model. We are using the store model for now, though we
* could use any other GtkTreeModel */
store = gtk_tree_store_new (N_COLUMNS,
G_TYPE_STRING,
G_TYPE_STRING,
G_TYPE_BOOLEAN);
/* custom function to fill the model with data */
populate_tree_model (store);
/* Create a view */
view = gtk_tree_view_new_with_model (GTK_TREE_MODEL (store));
/* The view now holds a reference. We can get rid of our own
* reference */
g_object_unref (G_OBJECT (store));
/* Create a cell render and arbitrarily make it red for demonstration
* purposes */
renderer = gtk_cell_renderer_text_new ();
g_object_set (G_OBJECT (renderer), "foreground", "red", NULL);
/* Create a column, associating the "text" attribute of the
* cell_renderer to the first column of the model */
column = gtk_tree_view_column_new_with_attributes ("Author",
renderer,
"text", AUTHOR_COLUMN,
NULL);
/* Add the column to the view. */
gtk_tree_view_append_column (GTK_TREE_VIEW (tree), column);
/* Second column.. title of the book. */
renderer = gtk_cell_renderer_text_new ();
column = gtk_tree_view_column_new_with_attributes ("Title",
renderer,
"text", TITLE_COLUMN,
NULL);
gtk_tree_view_append_column (GTK_TREE_VIEW (tree), column);
/* Last column.. whether a book is checked out. */
renderer = gtk_cell_renderer_toggle_new ();
column = gtk_tree_view_column_new_with_attributes ("Checked out",
renderer,
"active", CHECKED_COLUMN,
NULL);
gtk_tree_view_append_column (GTK_TREE_VIEW (tree), column);
/* Now we can manipulate the view just like any other GTK widget */
...
}
]]>
</programlisting></informalexample>
......
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