Commit 357ab76a authored by Matthias Clasen's avatar Matthias Clasen
Browse files

Additions.

parent 47eb4aae
2004-10-16 Matthias Clasen <mclasen@redhat.com>
* gtk/glossary.xml: Additions.
2004-10-15 Matthias Clasen <mclasen@redhat.com>
* gtk/tmpl/gtkaboutdialog.sgml: More short description
......
......@@ -153,9 +153,10 @@
<glossterm>model column</glossterm>
<glossdef>
<para>
A column in a tree model, holding data of a certain type. The types which
can be stored in the columns of a model have to be specified when the model
is constructed, see e.g, <link linkend="gtk-list-store-new">gtk_list_store_new()</link>.
A column in a tree model, holding data of a certain type.
The types which can be stored in the columns of a model
have to be specified when the model is constructed, see
e.g. <link linkend="gtk-list-store-new">gtk_list_store_new()</link>.
</para>
<glossseealso>
<glossterm linkend="view-column">view column</glossterm>
......@@ -167,17 +168,18 @@
<glossterm>model-view widget</glossterm>
<glossdef>
<para>
These widgets follow the well-known model-view pattern, which separates the
data (the model) to be displayed from the component which does the actual
visualization (the view). Examples of this pattern in GTK+ are the
<link linkend="GtkTreeView">GtkTreeView</link>/<link linkend="GtkTreeModel">GtkTreeModel</link>
These widgets follow the well-known model-view pattern, which separates
the data (the model) to be displayed from the component which does the
actual visualization (the view). Examples of this pattern in GTK+ are
the <link linkend="GtkTreeView">GtkTreeView</link>/<link linkend="GtkTreeModel">GtkTreeModel</link>
and
<link linkend="GtkTextView">GtkTextView</link>/<link linkend="GtkTextBuffer">GtkTextBuffer</link>
</para>
<para>
One important advantage of this pattern is that it is possible to display the
same model in multiple views; another one that the separation of the model
allows a great deal of flexibility, as demonstrated by e.g.
One important advantage of this pattern is that it is possible to
display the same model in multiple views; another one that the
separation of the model allows a great deal of flexibility, as
demonstrated by e.g.
<link linkend="GtkTreeModelSort">GtkTreeModelSort</link> or
<link linkend="GtkTreeModelFilter">GtkTreeModelFilter</link>.
</para>
......@@ -194,7 +196,7 @@
<constant>GTK_NO_WINDOW</constant> <link
linkend="GtkWidgetFlags">flag</link> set, and can be tested
with the <link
linkend="gtk-widget-no-window-caps"><function>GTK_WIDGET_NO_WINDOW()</function></link>
linkend="gtk-widget-no-window:caps"><function>GTK_WIDGET_NO_WINDOW()</function></link>
macro.
</para>
</glossdef>
......@@ -231,7 +233,7 @@
Widgets that don't own the GdkWindow on which they draw are
called <glossterm linkend="no-window">no-window
widgets</glossterm>. This can be tested with the <link
linkend="gtk-widget-no-window-caps"><function>GTK_WIDGET_NO_WINDOW()</function></link>
linkend="gtk-widget-no-window:caps"><function>GTK_WIDGET_NO_WINDOW()</function></link>
macro. Normally, these widgets draw on their parent's
GdkWindow.
</para>
......@@ -270,11 +272,11 @@
<para>
GDK inherited the concept of screen from the X window system,
which considers a screen to be a rectangular area, on which
applications may place their windows. Each screen has a
<glossterm linkend="rootwindow">root window</glossterm> which
defines the area of the screen. Screens under X may have quite
dissimilar <glossterm linkend="visual">visuals</glossterm>.
applications may place their windows. Screens under X may have
quite dissimilar <glossterm linkend="visual">visuals</glossterm>.
Each screen can stretch across multiple physical monitors.
</para>
<para>
In GDK, screens are represented by
<link linkend="GdkScreen">GdkScreen</link> objects.
</para>
......@@ -286,8 +288,8 @@
<glossdef>
<para>
A style encapsulates what GTK+ needs to know in order to draw
a widget. Styles can be modified with <link linkend="gtk-Resource-Files">resource
files</link>.
a widget. Styles can be modified with
<link linkend="gtk-Resource-Files">resource files</link>.
</para>
</glossdef>
</glossentry>
......@@ -298,8 +300,8 @@
<para>
A <glossterm linkend="widget">widget</glossterm> that does not
require a <glossterm linkend="parent">parent</glossterm>
container. The only toplevel widget in GTK+ is <link
linkend="GtkWindow">GtkWindow</link>.
container. The only toplevel widgets in GTK+ are <link
linkend="GtkWindow">GtkWindow</link> and widgets derived from it.
</para>
<glossseealso>
<glossterm linkend="container">container</glossterm>
......@@ -329,7 +331,25 @@
</glossseealso>
</glossdef>
</glossentry>
<glossentry id="visual">
<glossterm>visual</glossterm>
<glossdef>
<para>
A visual describes how color information is stored in pixels.
A <glossterm linkend="screen">screen</glossterm> may support
multiple visuals. On modern hardware, the most common visuals
are truecolor visuals, which store a fixed number of bits
(typically 8) for the red, green and blue components of a color.
</para>
<para>
On ancient hardware, one may still meet indexed visuals, which
store color information as an index into a color map, or even
monochrome visuals.
</para>
</glossdef>
</glossentry>
<glossentry id="widget">
<glossterm>widget</glossterm>
<glossdef>
......
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