Commit 1fd8d3b4 authored by Matthias Clasen's avatar Matthias Clasen

Merge branch 'matthiasc/for-master' into 'master'

docs: Update getting started section

Closes #3601

See merge request !3099
parents d7050c63 3a18a6dd
Pipeline #248762 passed with stages
in 23 minutes and 13 seconds
......@@ -343,20 +343,19 @@ Many widgets, like buttons, do all their drawing themselves. You just tell
them the label you want to see, and they figure out what font to use, draw
the button outline and focus rectangle, etc. Sometimes, it is necessary to
do some custom drawing. In that case, a GtkDrawingArea might be the right
widget to use. It offers a canvas on which you can draw by connecting to
the ::draw signal.
widget to use. It offers a canvas on which you can draw by setting its
draw function.
The contents of a widget often need to be partially or fully redrawn,
e.g. when another window is moved and uncovers part of the widget, or
when the window containing it is resized. It is also possible to explicitly
cause part or all of the widget to be redrawn, by calling
gtk_widget_queue_draw() or its variants. GTK takes care of most of the
details by providing a ready-to-use cairo context to the ::draw signal
handler.
The following example shows a ::draw signal handler. It is a bit more
complicated than the previous examples, since it also demonstrates
input event handling by means of event controllers.
cause a widget to be redrawn, by calling gtk_widget_queue_draw(). GTK takes
care of most of the details by providing a ready-to-use cairo context to the
draw function.
The following example shows how to use a draw function with GtkDrawingArea.
It is a bit more complicated than the previous examples, since it also
demonstrates input event handling with event controllers.
![Drawing](drawing.png)
......
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