Commit b832b295 authored by Adrian Custer's avatar Adrian Custer Committed by Jody Goldberg

New chapter organization New figures/*.png names Changed all <graphic> to


2003-07-07 Adrian Custer <acuster@nature.berkeley.edu>

	* New chapter organization
	* New figures/*.png names
	* Changed all <graphic> to <mediaobject>
	* Added "Getting Started" chapter
	* Set up links for help buttons in dialogs
	* Added section headings for future text.

2003-06-01 Adrian Custer <acuster@nature.berkeley.edu>

	* Complete redsign of gnumeric/doc/C/

2003-06-01 Adrian Custer <acuster@nature.berkeley.edu>

	* New ChangeLog
parent fdea0b67
This diff is collapsed.
SUBDIRS = figures
lang = C
locale = C
entities = \
analysis-tools.xml \
appendix-glossary.xml \
authors.xml \
autocorrect.xml \
autofill.xml \
autosave.xml \
cell_refer.xml \
chapter-autofill.xml \
chapter-getting-started.xml \
copying-moving.xml \
editing.xml \
fdl-appendix.xml \
files.xml \
fill-series.xml \
filter.xml \
formulas.xml \
func-footer.xml \
func-header.xml \
gnumeric.xml \
graphs.xml \
gui-elements.xml \
license.xml \
menus.xml \
number-format.xml \
preface.xml \
printing.xml \
scenarios.xml \
selections.xml \
shuffling.xml \
simulation.xml \
solver.xml \
toolbars.xml \
worksheet.xml \
keybinding-appendix.xml
# introduction.xml \
omffile = gnumeric-C.omf
entities = about-authors.xml \
about-compiling.xml \
about-get-involved.xml \
about-history.xml \
about-license.xml \
analysis-complexNumbers.xml \
analysis-overview.xml \
analysis-simulation.xml \
analysis-solver.xml \
analysis-statistical.xml \
appendix-glossary.xml \
appendix-keybindings.xml \
configuration-localization.xml \
configuration-overview.xml \
configuration-plugins.xml \
configuration-preferences.xml \
configuration-toolbars.xml \
datasource.xml \
data-commentNlink.xml \
data-delete.xml \
data-insert.xml \
data-entry.xml \
data-format.xml \
data-modify.xml \
data-move-copy.xml \
data-overview.xml \
data-selections.xml \
data-types.xml \
extending-code.xml \
extending-functions.xml \
extending-overview.xml \
extending-plugins.xml \
extending-python.xml \
files-autosave.xml \
files-opening.xml \
files-overview.xml \
files-saving.xml \
gnumeric.xml \
graphics-drawings.xml \
graphics-images.xml \
graphics-overview.xml \
graphics-plots.xml \
gui-menus.xml \
gui-mouse.xml \
gui-other-elements.xml \
gui-overview.xml \
gui-toolbars.xml \
legal.xml \
manual-usage.xml \
morehelp.xml \
printing.xml \
quick-start.xml \
welcome.xml \
workbooks.xml \
worksheets.xml
# functions.xml # added in gnumeric-doc.make
EXTRA_DIST = gnumeric.1
include $(top_srcdir)/doc/gnumeric-doc.make
<sect1 id="sect-about-compiling">
<title>How to Build Gnumeric from Source Code</title>
<para>
This section has not yet been written.
</para>
</sect1>
<sect1 id="sect-about-getting-involved">
<title>How to Get Involved in Gnumeric</title>
<para>
This section has not yet been written.
</para>
</sect1>
<sect1 id="sect-about-history">
<title>The History of Gnumeric</title>
<para>
This section has not yet been written.
</para>
</sect1>
<sect1 id="sect-advanced-analysis-complexNumbers">
<title>Analysis using Complex Numbers</title>
<para>
Complex numbers can be used in <application>Gnumeric</application>
but, because they are not fundamental types, all the analysis must
be done with functions.
</para>
</sect1>
<sect1 id="sect-analysis-overview">
<title>Advanced Analysis in Gnumeric</title>
<para>
There are several kinds of analysis which can be performed using
the <application>Gnumeric</application> spreadsheet. These include
statistical analysis and linear programming methods. These are
described in this chapter.
</para>
</sect1>
<sect1 id="sect-advanced-analysis-simulation">
<title>Simulation Analysis</title>
<para>
</para>
</sect1>
<sect1 id="solver-chapter">
<sect1 id="sect-analysis-solver">
<title>Solver</title>
<para>With Gnumeric Solver you can solve linear programs.</para>
......@@ -74,10 +74,17 @@
sheet much more readable. The sheet for our maximization problem
would look like this:</para>
<figure id="linear-program-example">
<figure id="fig-linear-program-example">
<title>Linear programming example</title>
<screenshot>
<graphic fileref="figures/solver-01.png"></graphic>
<mediaobject>
<imageobject>
<imagedata fileref="figures/solver-01.png" format="PNG" />
</imageobject>
<textobject>
<phrase>An image of a worksheet with a linear programing problem.</phrase>
</textobject>
</mediaobject>
</screenshot>
</figure>
......@@ -107,10 +114,17 @@
<para>Now it is time to select `Solver...' from the `Tools' menu.
After you have done it, the following dialog will appear:</para>
<figure id="solver-dialog-1">
<figure id="fig-solver-dialog-1">
<title>The empty Solver dialog.</title>
<screenshot>
<graphic fileref="figures/solver-02.png"></graphic>
<mediaobject>
<imageobject>
<imagedata fileref="figures/solver-02.png" format="PNG" />
</imageobject>
<textobject>
<phrase>An image of the solver dialog open to the "Parameters" tab.</phrase>
</textobject>
</mediaobject>
</screenshot>
</figure>
......@@ -156,10 +170,17 @@
page from the top of the dialog and the following page should
appear.</para>
<figure id="solver-add-constraint-dialog">
<figure id="fig-solver-add-constraint-dialog">
<title>Add constraint dialog.</title>
<screenshot>
<graphic fileref="figures/solver-03.png"></graphic>
<mediaobject>
<imageobject>
<imagedata fileref="figures/solver-03.png" format="PNG" />
</imageobject>
<textobject>
<phrase>An image of the solver dialog open to the "Constraints" tab.</phrase>
</textobject>
</mediaobject>
</screenshot>
</figure>
......@@ -186,10 +207,18 @@
define the next one. When you have typed in all the
constraints, the Solver dialog should look like this:</para>
<figure id="solver-dialog-2">
<figure id="fig-solver-dialog-2">
<title>The solver dialog</title>
<screenshot>
<graphic fileref="figures/solver-04.png"></graphic>
<mediaobject>
<imageobject>
<imagedata fileref="figures/solver-04.png" format="PNG" />
</imageobject>
<textobject>
<phrase>An image of the solver dialog open to the
"Constraints" tab with constraints entered.</phrase>
</textobject>
</mediaobject>
</screenshot>
</figure>
......@@ -334,7 +363,7 @@
</sect1>
<sect1 id="goal-seek">
<sect1 id="sect-analysis-goalseek">
<title>Goal Seek Tool</title>
<para>Use Goal Seek Tool to search for a value of a single model
......
<sect1 id="autocorrect">
<title>AutoCorrect Tool</title>
<para>
The auto-correction tool recognizes and attempts to automaticly repair
several common typing errors. The corrections are configured and activated
using AutoCorrect Dialog, available via ``Auto Correct'' in the ``Tools''
menu.
</para>
<figure id="autocorrect-figure">
<title>The Auto Correct dialog.</title>
<screenshot>
<graphic fileref="figures/auto-correct.png"></graphic>
</screenshot>
</figure>
<sect2 id="correct-initial-capitals">
<title>Correct TWo INitial CApitals</title>
<para>A common mistake is to hold down the shift key a little bit
too long while typing initial letters. When it happens, you will
get two initial capitals instead of one. If this correction rule
is activated, the second letter of words beginning with two
capital letters is automatically lowercased. For example, if you
type `TOtal' into a cell it is replaced by `Total'. Note that if
the word contains two capital letters only, it is not
replaced.</para>
<para>It is possible to specify exceptions to this tool. For
example, you do not want the tool to replace the word `PVbonds'
when it is typed. To specify exceptions, press the
``Exceptions...'' button in the dialog. This should pop up the
``Auto correct exceptions'' dialog. In this dialog, select the
``INitial CApitals'' page. In this page, type `PVbonds' into the
``Do not correct'' entry, and press ``Add'' button. Now the word
should be included in the list of exceptions. To remove a word
from the list, select the word and press the ``Remove'' button.
If you now press ``Ok'' the exceptions in the list are
activated.</para>
</sect2>
<sect2 id="correct-first-letter">
<title>Capitalize first letter of sentence</title>
<para>If this correction rule is activated, the first letter of a
sentence typed into a cell is capitalized, if it is a lowercase
letter in the first place. Only text that ends to a dot is
considered a sentence.</para>
<para>It is possible to specify exceptions to this tool. For
example, you do not want the tool to capitalize letters after
acronym `i.g.'. To specify exceptions, press the
``Exceptions...'' button in the dialog. This should pop up the
``Auto correct exceptions'' dialog. In this dialog, select the
``First letter'' page. In this page, type `i.g.' into the ``Do
not capitalize after'' entry, and press ``Add'' button. Now the
word should be included in the list of exceptions. To remove a
word from the list, select the word and press the ``Remove''
button. If you now press ``Ok'' the exceptions in the list are
activated.</para>
</sect2>
<sect2 id="correct-capitalize-days">
<title>Capitalize names of days</title>
<para>If this correction rule is activated, the first letter of a
name of a day is capitalized automatically. For example, if you
type `monday', it is automatically replaced by `Monday'.</para>
</sect2>
</sect1>
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<sect1 id="autofill-chap">
<title>Autofill Introduction</title>
<para>
Often times, a set of sequential or ordered numbers needs to be
written. While simple, it is a tedious task to complete.
<application>Gnumeric</application> allows for a pattern to be set
with items that can be ordered and have the rest of your sorting
done automatically.
</para>
<para>
A good example of such a use would be if you wanted to setup a
list of the months or television station numbers.
</para>
<sect2 id="autofill-basic">
<title>My First Autofill</title>
<para>
For being such a timesaver, autofilling in
<application>Gnumeric</application> is actually quite simple.
To do an autofill:
<orderedlist numeration="arabic">
<listitem>
<para>
Enter a number into the first cell you wish to autofill.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
Enter a value into the second cell you wish to
autofill. This must be adjacent to the first cell. This
sets the increment to use when autofilling the rest of your cells.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
Select the cells you just entered. At the bottom-right of
the selection should be a small box. Your mouse cursor
will change to a cross-hair when placed over the box.
Press and hold on the box. Drag in the direction you wish to
increment. You can also autofill using the menus. Make
your selection and use:
<menuchoice>
<guimenu>Edit</guimenu>
<guisubmenu>Fill</guisubmenu>
<guimenuitem>Autofill</guimenuitem>
</menuchoice>
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
Release the button. The selection you created with the
small box should now be filled with numbers based on the
increment you set in the first two boxes.
</para>
</listitem>
</orderedlist>
</para>
<tip id="autofill-months">
<title>Autofilling Months</title>
<para>
<application>Gnumeric</application> is able to complete month
names for you. Just type your starting month in a cell, the
second month in the second cell, and drag like you would if
you were doing numbers. <application>Gnumeric</application>
will also increment:
<variablelist>
<varlistentry>
<term>Simple Values</term>
<listitem>
<para>
1, 2, 3, etc.
</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
<term>Weekday</term>
<listitem>
<para>
Monday, Tuesday, etc.
</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
<term>Short Weekdays</term>
<listitem>
<para>
Mon, Tues, etc.
</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
<term>Months</term>
<listitem>
<para>
January, February, etc.
</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
<term>Short Months</term>
<listitem>
<para>
Jan, Feb, etc.
</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
<term>Strings with Numbers</term>
<listitem>
<para>
Item1, Item2, etc
</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
<term>Date Strings</term>
<listitem>
<para>
11/14/2001, 11/15/2001, etc.
</para>
<para>
<application>Gnumeric</application> supports
incrementing the date by month, date, or year.
</para>
<para>
Note that, While <application>Gnumeric</application>
will increment days of the month, if you do
11/14/2001 and 12/14/2001, it will recognize it as
the same day of the month and increment to 1/14/2002
instead of the day difference.
</para>
</listitem>
</varlistentry>
</variablelist>
</para>
</tip>
</sect2>
<sect2 id="autofill-adjacent-size">
<title>Using Adjacent Columns for Autofill Length</title>
<para>
<application>Gnumeric</application> is able to not only autofill
based on the selection you make, but autofill to the length of an
adjacent column.
<example>
<title>Adjacent Columns for Autofill Length Example</title>
<para>
You enter A1:A10 with random information. In B1,B2 you
enter 1 and 2 respectfully. Column B will increment through
B10, based on the length of A. The increment used is
normally generated by the difference between B1 and B2.
</para>
</example>
To use an adjacent column for length control:
<orderedlist numeration="arabic">
<listitem>
<para>
Fill a column or row with information.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
Enter information into a column or row to either the right
or bottom of the previous information.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
Select the column or row you wish to autofill.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
Double-click the small box at the bottom-right to
increment by column, with the length controlled by the
adjacent column. Double-click while holding Alt to set
the size to the above row.
</para>
</listitem>
</orderedlist>
</para>
</sect2>
</sect1>
<sect1 id="usage-autosave">
<title>AutoSave Tool</title>
<para>The AutoSave tool can save your workbook automatically at
specific intervals. You can specify how often you want your work to
be saved by entering a number in the ``Minutes'' box. If you check
the ``Prompt before saving'' button on, Gnumeric asks a confirmation
before each automatic save.</para>
<figure id="usage-autosave-figure">
<title>The Auto Save Tool dialog</title>
<mediaobject>
<imageobject>
<imagedata fileref="figures/auto-save.png" format="PNG" />
</imageobject>
</mediaobject>
</figure>
</sect1>
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<sect1 id="cell-referencing">
<title>Cell Referencing</title>
<para>
Each cell in a spreadsheet is named by its column and row
labels. The row labels are numbers and the column labels are
letters. The first cell, therefore, is called A1. One row down
and one column over is cell B2, and so forth.
</para>
<para>
To reference the value stored in a single cell, enter its
coordinates as a function argument. For example, to have the data
in cell B1 appear in another cell, enter =B1 into that cell.
</para>
<example id="simplecellrefer">
<title>Some examples of function syntax</title>
<programlisting>
=EXP(B1)
=COS(A2)
</programlisting>
</example>
<sect2>
<title>Absolute cell referencing</title>
<para>Cells can be referenced in the default way (relative
referencing), or by using absolute referening. Absolute
referencing means that when the cell is copied, the cell
reference does not change. Normally, autofilling a cell range or
moving cell will change its cell reference to so that it
maintains a relation to the original cell. Absolute referencing
prevents these changes.
</para>
<tip id="why-bother">
<title>When Does Relative Referencing Make a Difference?</title>
<para>
The difference between absolute and relative cell references
only matters if you are copying or moving cells that contain
cell references. For cells that are going to remain in place,
both the relative and absolute references have the same result.
</para>
</tip>
<example id="relative-referencing-explained">
<title>Relative References</title>
<para>
For example, if =A1 is the formula entered into cell B2, cell
B2 will displat the data in cell A1, which is one row up and
one column left. Then, if you copy the contents of B2 to cell
F6, cell F6 will contain the value from E5, which is also one
row up and one column left.
</para>
<para>
For the copied cell to still refer to A1, specify absolute
references using the $ character: $A$1 refers to cell A1, no
matter where it is copied.
</para>
</example>
<para>
The format for absolute cell refencing is to use a '$' in front
of the cell coordinate that the you want to stay constant. The
column, row, sheet, or any combination of these can be held
constant.
</para>
<example id="cell-refer-absolute-reference">
<title>Absolute cell referencing examples</title>
<para>
What happens when a given formula is entered into cell B2,
then copied to other cells?
<variablelist>
<varlistentry>
<term>=A1</term>
<listitem><para>
=A1 is a normal, or relative, cell reference
function. When =A1 is entered into cell B2, it refers to
the value of data one cell up and one cell left from the
cell it is in. Therefore the value displayed in cell C2
will be the value of data in cell B1. Copied to cell R19,
the formula will display the data in cell Q18.
</para></listitem>
</varlistentry>
<varlistentry>
<term>=$A1</term>
<listitem><para>
In this case, the column value is absolute, but the row
value is relative. Therefore, if =$A1 is entered into
cell B2, the formula refers to the data in column A that
is one row up from the current location. Copied to cell
C2, the formula will refer to the data in cell A1. Copied
to cell R19, it will refer to the data in A18.
</para></listitem>
</varlistentry>