Commit acfb76af authored by Matthias Clasen's avatar Matthias Clasen

Docs: don't use <footnote>

It basically does not work in the HTML output.
parent 67b0afd5
......@@ -144,14 +144,10 @@
* an D-Bus client, it is often easier to use the g_bus_own_name(),
* g_bus_watch_name() or g_dbus_proxy_new_for_bus() APIs.
*
* As an exception to the usual GLib rule that a particular object must not be
* used by two threads at the same time, #GDBusConnection's methods may be
* called from any thread<footnote>
* <para>
* This is so that g_bus_get() and g_bus_get_sync() can safely return the
* same #GDBusConnection when called from any thread.
* </para>
* </footnote>.
* As an exception to the usual GLib rule that a particular object must not
* be used by two threads at the same time, #GDBusConnection's methods may be
* called from any thread. This is so that g_bus_get() and g_bus_get_sync()
* can safely return the same #GDBusConnection when called from any thread.
*
* Most of the ways to obtain a #GDBusConnection automatically initialize it
* (i.e. connect to D-Bus): for instance, g_dbus_connection_new() and
......
......@@ -1761,11 +1761,11 @@ g_date_subtract_years (GDate *d,
* @year: year to check
*
* Returns %TRUE if the year is a leap year.
* <footnote><para>For the purposes of this function,
* leap year is every year divisible by 4 unless that year
* is divisible by 100. If it is divisible by 100 it would
* be a leap year only if that year is also divisible
* by 400.</para></footnote>
*
* For the purposes of this function, leap year is every year
* divisible by 4 unless that year is divisible by 100. If it
* is divisible by 100 it would be a leap year only if that year
* is also divisible by 400.
*
* Returns: %TRUE if the year is a leap year
*/
......
......@@ -68,12 +68,11 @@
*
* To achieve these goals, the slice allocator uses a sophisticated,
* layered design that has been inspired by Bonwick's slab allocator
* <footnote><para>
* <ulink url="http://citeseer.ist.psu.edu/bonwick94slab.html">[Bonwick94]</ulink> Jeff Bonwick, The slab allocator: An object-caching kernel
* (<ulink url="http://citeseer.ist.psu.edu/bonwick94slab.html">[Bonwick94]</ulink> Jeff Bonwick, The slab allocator: An object-caching kernel
* memory allocator. USENIX 1994, and
* <ulink url="http://citeseer.ist.psu.edu/bonwick01magazines.html">[Bonwick01]</ulink> Bonwick and Jonathan Adams, Magazines and vmem: Extending the
* slab allocator to many cpu's and arbitrary resources. USENIX 2001
* </para></footnote>.
* slab allocator to many cpu's and arbitrary resources. USENIX 2001)
*
* It uses posix_memalign() to optimize allocations of many equally-sized
* chunks, and has per-thread free lists (the so-called magazine layer)
* to quickly satisfy allocation requests of already known structure sizes.
......
......@@ -52,12 +52,10 @@
* basically they are a per-type facility that is inherited. A signal
* emission mainly involves invocation of a certain set of callbacks
* in precisely defined manner. There are two main categories of such
* callbacks, per-object
* <footnote><para>Although signals can deal with any kind of instantiatable
* type, i'm referring to those types as "object types" in the following,
* simply because that is the context most users will encounter signals in.
* </para></footnote>
* ones and user provided ones.
* callbacks, per-object ones and user provided ones.
* (Although signals can deal with any kind of instantiatable type, I'm
* referring to those types as "object types" in the following, simply
* because that is the context most users will encounter signals in.)
* The per-object callbacks are most often referred to as "object method
* handler" or "default (signal) handler", while user provided callbacks are
* usually just called "signal handler".
......
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