Commit 3d42934b authored by Matthias Clasen's avatar Matthias Clasen

Docs: don't use the structname tag

Just avoid explicit docbook markup.
parent 6f3c4655
......@@ -132,8 +132,8 @@
/**
* GApplicationCommandLineClass:
*
* The <structname>GApplicationCommandLineClass</structname> structure
* contains private data only
* The #GApplicationCommandLineClass-struct
* contains private data only.
*
* Since: 2.28
**/
......
......@@ -1547,9 +1547,9 @@ g_ptr_array_foreach (GPtrArray *array,
* elements are added to the #GByteArray.
* @len: the number of elements in the #GByteArray.
*
* The <structname>GByteArray</structname> struct allows access to the
* public fields of a <structname>GByteArray</structname>.
**/
* The #GByteArray-struct allows access to the public fields of
* a #GByteArray.
*/
/**
* g_byte_array_new:
......
......@@ -117,8 +117,8 @@
* @tv_usec: microseconds
*
* Represents a precise time, with seconds and microseconds.
* Similar to the <structname>struct timeval</structname> returned by
* the gettimeofday() UNIX system call.
* Similar to the struct timeval returned by the gettimeofday()
* UNIX system call.
*
* GLib is attempting to unify around the use of 64bit integers to
* represent microsecond-precision time. As such, this type will be
......@@ -137,29 +137,32 @@
* @year: the day of the day-month-year representation of the date
*
* Represents a day between January 1, Year 1 and a few thousand years in
* the future. None of its members should be accessed directly. If the
* <structname>GDate</structname> is obtained from g_date_new(), it will
* be safe to mutate but invalid and thus not safe for calendrical
* computations. If it's declared on the stack, it will contain garbage
* so must be initialized with g_date_clear(). g_date_clear() makes the
* date invalid but sane. An invalid date doesn't represent a day, it's
* "empty." A date becomes valid after you set it to a Julian day or you
* set a day, month, and year.
* the future. None of its members should be accessed directly.
*
* If the #GDate-struct is obtained from g_date_new(), it will be safe
* to mutate but invalid and thus not safe for calendrical computations.
*
* If it's declared on the stack, it will contain garbage so must be
* initialized with g_date_clear(). g_date_clear() makes the date invalid
* but sane. An invalid date doesn't represent a day, it's "empty." A date
* becomes valid after you set it to a Julian day or you set a day, month,
* and year.
*/
/**
* GTime:
*
* Simply a replacement for <type>time_t</type>. It has been deprecated
* since it is <emphasis>not</emphasis> equivalent to <type>time_t</type>
* on 64-bit platforms with a 64-bit <type>time_t</type>.
* Unrelated to #GTimer.
* Simply a replacement for time_t. It has been deprecated
* since it is <emphasis>not</emphasis> equivalent to time_t
* on 64-bit platforms with a 64-bit time_t. Unrelated to #GTimer.
*
* Note that #GTime is defined to always be a 32bit integer,
* unlike time_t which may be 64bit on some systems. Therefore,
* #GTime will overflow in the year 2038, and you cannot use the
* address of a #GTime variable as argument to the UNIX time()
* function.
*
* Note that <type>GTime</type> is defined to always be a 32bit integer,
* unlike <type>time_t</type> which may be 64bit on some systems.
* Therefore, <type>GTime</type> will overflow in the year 2038, and
* you cannot use the address of a <type>GTime</type> variable as argument
* to the UNIX time() function. Instead, do the following:
* Instead, do the following:
* |[
* time_t ttime;
* GTime gtime;
......@@ -1936,12 +1939,11 @@ g_date_compare (const GDate *lhs,
/**
* g_date_to_struct_tm:
* @date: a #GDate to set the <structname>struct tm</structname> from
* @tm: <structname>struct tm</structname> to fill
* @date: a #GDate to set the struct tm from
* @tm: struct tm to fill
*
* Fills in the date-related bits of a <structname>struct tm</structname>
* using the @date value. Initializes the non-date parts with something
* sane but meaningless.
* Fills in the date-related bits of a struct tm using the @date value.
* Initializes the non-date parts with something sane but meaningless.
*/
void
g_date_to_struct_tm (const GDate *d,
......
......@@ -59,8 +59,7 @@
* The default behaviour is to call the hooks @destroy function
* @dummy: unused
*
* The <structname>GHookList</structname> struct represents a
* list of hook functions.
* The #GHookList-struct represents a list of hook functions.
*/
/**
......@@ -157,8 +156,7 @@
* @destroy: the default @finalize_hook function of a #GHookList calls
* this member of the hook that is being finalized
*
* The <structname>GHook</structname> struct represents a single hook
* function in a #GHookList.
* The #GHook-struct represents a single hook function in a #GHookList.
*/
/**
......
......@@ -56,10 +56,9 @@
/**
* GPatternSpec:
*
* A <structname>GPatternSpec</structname> is the 'compiled' form of a
* pattern. This structure is opaque and its fields cannot be accessed
* directly.
**/
* A #GPatternSpec-struct is the 'compiled' form of a pattern. This
* structure is opaque and its fields cannot be accessed directly.
*/
/* keep enum and structure of gpattern.c and patterntest.c in sync */
typedef enum
......
......@@ -101,10 +101,9 @@
* doesn't yield equally distributed numbers.
*
* GLib changed the seeding algorithm for the pseudo-random number
* generator Mersenne Twister, as used by
* <structname>GRand</structname> and <structname>GRandom</structname>.
* generator Mersenne Twister, as used by #GRand and #GRandom.
* This was necessary, because some seeds would yield very bad
* pseudo-random streams. Also the pseudo-random integers generated by
* pseudo-random streams. Also the pseudo-random integers generated by
* <function>g_rand*_int_range()</function> will have a slightly better
* equal distribution with the new version of GLib.
*
......
......@@ -74,8 +74,8 @@
* See your C library manual for more details about access().
*
* Returns: zero if the pathname refers to an existing file system
* object that has all the tested permissions, or -1 otherwise or on
* error.
* object that has all the tested permissions, or -1 otherwise
* or on error.
*
* Since: 2.8
*/
......@@ -126,7 +126,7 @@ g_access (const gchar *filename,
*
* See your C library manual for more details about chmod().
*
* Returns: zero if the operation succeeded, -1 on error.
* Returns: 0 if the operation succeeded, -1 on error
*
* Since: 2.8
*/
......@@ -181,8 +181,9 @@ g_chmod (const gchar *filename,
*
* See your C library manual for more details about open().
*
* Returns: a new file descriptor, or -1 if an error occurred. The
* return value can be used exactly like the return value from open().
* Returns: a new file descriptor, or -1 if an error occurred.
* The return value can be used exactly like the return value
* from open().
*
* Since: 2.6
*/
......@@ -243,8 +244,9 @@ g_open (const gchar *filename,
*
* See your C library manual for more details about creat().
*
* Returns: a new file descriptor, or -1 if an error occurred. The
* return value can be used exactly like the return value from creat().
* Returns: a new file descriptor, or -1 if an error occurred.
* The return value can be used exactly like the return value
* from creat().
*
* Since: 2.8
*/
......@@ -432,41 +434,40 @@ g_chdir (const gchar *path)
/**
* GStatBuf:
*
* A type corresponding to the appropriate struct type for the stat
* A type corresponding to the appropriate struct type for the stat()
* system call, depending on the platform and/or compiler being used.
*
* See g_stat() for more information.
**/
*/
/**
* g_stat:
* @filename: a pathname in the GLib file name encoding (UTF-8 on Windows)
* @buf: a pointer to a <structname>stat</structname> struct, which
* will be filled with the file information
* @buf: a pointer to a stat struct, which will be filled with the file
* information
*
* A wrapper for the POSIX stat() function. The stat() function
* returns information about a file. On Windows the stat() function in
* the C library checks only the FAT-style READONLY attribute and does
* not look at the ACL at all. Thus on Windows the protection bits in
* the st_mode field are a fabrication of little use.
* the @st_mode field are a fabrication of little use.
*
* On Windows the Microsoft C libraries have several variants of the
* <structname>stat</structname> struct and stat() function with names
* like "_stat", "_stat32", "_stat32i64" and "_stat64i32". The one
* used here is for 32-bit code the one with 32-bit size and time
* fields, specifically called "_stat32".
* stat struct and stat() function with names like _stat(), _stat32(),
* _stat32i64() and _stat64i32(). The one used here is for 32-bit code
* the one with 32-bit size and time fields, specifically called _stat32().
*
* In Microsoft's compiler, by default "struct stat" means one with
* 64-bit time fields while in MinGW "struct stat" is the legacy one
* In Microsoft's compiler, by default struct stat means one with
* 64-bit time fields while in MinGW struct stat is the legacy one
* with 32-bit fields. To hopefully clear up this messs, the gstdio.h
* header defines a type GStatBuf which is the appropriate struct type
* header defines a type #GStatBuf which is the appropriate struct type
* depending on the platform and/or compiler being used. On POSIX it
* is just "struct stat", but note that even on POSIX platforms,
* "stat" might be a macro.
* is just struct stat, but note that even on POSIX platforms, stat()
* might be a macro.
*
* See your C library manual for more details about stat().
*
* Returns: 0 if the information was successfully retrieved, -1 if an error
* occurred
* Returns: 0 if the information was successfully retrieved,
* -1 if an error occurred
*
* Since: 2.6
*/
......@@ -508,8 +509,8 @@ g_stat (const gchar *filename,
/**
* g_lstat:
* @filename: a pathname in the GLib file name encoding (UTF-8 on Windows)
* @buf: a pointer to a <structname>stat</structname> struct, which
* will be filled with the file information
* @buf: a pointer to a stat struct, which will be filled with the file
* information
*
* A wrapper for the POSIX lstat() function. The lstat() function is
* like stat() except that in the case of symbolic links, it returns
......@@ -519,8 +520,8 @@ g_stat (const gchar *filename,
*
* See your C library manual for more details about lstat().
*
* Returns: 0 if the information was successfully retrieved, -1 if an error
* occurred
* Returns: 0 if the information was successfully retrieved,
* -1 if an error occurred
*
* Since: 2.6
*/
......@@ -678,24 +679,22 @@ g_rmdir (const gchar *filename)
/**
* g_fopen:
* @filename: a pathname in the GLib file name encoding (UTF-8 on Windows)
* @mode: a string describing the mode in which the file should be
* opened
* @mode: a string describing the mode in which the file should be opened
*
* A wrapper for the stdio fopen() function. The fopen() function
* opens a file and associates a new stream with it.
*
* Because file descriptors are specific to the C library on Windows,
* and a file descriptor is partof the <type>FILE</type> struct, the
* <type>FILE</type> pointer returned by this function makes sense
* only to functions in the same C library. Thus if the GLib-using
* code uses a different C library than GLib does, the
* <type>FILE</type> pointer returned by this function cannot be
* passed to C library functions like fprintf() or fread().
* and a file descriptor is part of the FILE struct, the FILE* returned
* by this function makes sense only to functions in the same C library.
* Thus if the GLib-using code uses a different C library than GLib does,
* the FILE* returned by this function cannot be passed to C library
* functions like fprintf() or fread().
*
* See your C library manual for more details about fopen().
*
* Returns: A <type>FILE</type> pointer if the file was successfully
* opened, or %NULL if an error occurred
* Returns: A FILE* if the file was successfully opened, or %NULL if
* an error occurred
*
* Since: 2.6
*/
......@@ -740,8 +739,7 @@ g_fopen (const gchar *filename,
/**
* g_freopen:
* @filename: a pathname in the GLib file name encoding (UTF-8 on Windows)
* @mode: a string describing the mode in which the file should be
* opened
* @mode: a string describing the mode in which the file should be opened
* @stream: (allow-none): an existing stream which will be reused, or %NULL
*
* A wrapper for the POSIX freopen() function. The freopen() function
......@@ -749,8 +747,8 @@ g_fopen (const gchar *filename,
*
* See your C library manual for more details about freopen().
*
* Returns: A <literal>FILE</literal> pointer if the file was successfully
* opened, or %NULL if an error occurred.
* Returns: A FILE* if the file was successfully opened, or %NULL if
* an error occurred.
*
* Since: 2.6
*/
......@@ -804,8 +802,7 @@ g_freopen (const gchar *filename,
* See your C library manual for more details about how utime() works
* on your system.
*
* Returns: 0 if the operation was successful, -1 if an error
* occurred
* Returns: 0 if the operation was successful, -1 if an error occurred
*
* Since: 2.18
*/
......
......@@ -47,7 +47,7 @@
* bytes of the element
*
* Each piece of memory that is pushed onto the stack
* is cast to a <structname>GTrashStack*</structname>.
* is cast to a GTrashStack*.
*/
/**
......
......@@ -73,10 +73,9 @@ typedef struct _GTreeNode GTreeNode;
/**
* GTree:
*
* The <structname>GTree</structname> struct is an opaque data
* structure representing a <link
* linkend="glib-Balanced-Binary-Trees">Balanced Binary Tree</link>. It
* should be accessed only by using the following functions.
* The #GTree-struct is an opaque data structure representing a <link
* linkend="glib-Balanced-Binary-Trees">Balanced Binary Tree</link>.
* It should be accessed only by using the following functions.
*/
struct _GTree
{
......
......@@ -82,7 +82,7 @@
* it must ensure that it is never unloaded, by calling g_module_make_resident().
*
* <example>
* <title>Calling a function defined in a <structname>GModule</structname></title>
* <title>Calling a function defined in a GModule</title>
* <programlisting>
* /&ast; the function signature for 'say_hello' &ast;/
* typedef void (* SayHelloFunc) (const char *message);
......
......@@ -4422,10 +4422,9 @@ gobject_init_ctor (void)
* G_TYPE_INSTANCE_GET_PRIVATE() macro.
*
* The following example shows attaching a private structure
* <structname>MyObjectPrivate</structname> to an object
* <structname>MyObject</structname> defined in the standard GObject
* fashion.
* type's class_init() function.
* MyObjectPrivate to an object MyObject defined in the standard
* GObject fashion in the type's class_init() function.
*
* Note the use of a structure member "priv" to avoid the overhead
* of repeatedly calling MY_OBJECT_GET_PRIVATE().
*
......
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