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THIS IS A DEVELOPMENT VERSION OF THE GIMP !! YOU SHOULD BE USING THE
STABLE VERSION 1.2 INSTEAD !! YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!


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There are some basic steps to building and installing the GIMP:

  1. You need to have installed a recent version of pkg-config available
     from http://www.freedesktop.org/software/pkgconfig/.  
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  2. You need to have installed GTK version 2.0.0 or better. Do not try
     to use an older GTK+ version (1.2.x), it will not work. GTK+-2.0
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     itself needs recent versions of GLib-2.0, Pango and ATK. Grab them
     from ftp://ftp.gtk.org/. GTK+-2.0 and friends can be installed side 
     by side with GTK+-1.2.
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  3. We require PangoFT2, a Pango backend that uses FreeType2. Make sure 
     you have FreeType2 installed before you compile Pango.
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  4. We use libart2. Grab the module libart_lgpl out of GNOME CVS or
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     fetch the tarball from 
     ftp://ftp.gnome.org/pub/gnome/pre-gnome2/sources/libart_lgpl/
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  5. You may want to install other third party libraries or programs that
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     are needed for some of the available plugins: TIFF, PNG, JPEG.
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  6. Configure the GIMP by running the `configure' script.
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     You may want to pass some options to it, see below.
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  7. Build the GIMP by running `make'.
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  8. Install the GIMP by running `make install'. In order to avoid clashes
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     with an installed stable version of The GIMP, we install a binary
     called gimp-1.3.
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Please make sure you don't have any old GTK+-2.0, jpeg, etc. libraries 
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lying around on your system, otherwise configure may fail to find the 
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new ones.
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Generic instructions for configuring and compiling auto-configured
packages are included below. Here is an illustration of commands that
might be used to build and install the GIMP. The actual configuration,
compilation and installation output is not shown.

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  % tar xvfz gimp-1.3.x.tar.gz   # unpack the sources
  % cd gimp-1.3.x                # change to the toplevel directory
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  % ./configure                  # run the `configure' script
  % make                         # build the GIMP
  % make install                 # install the GIMP

The `configure' script examines your system, and adapts the GIMP to
run on it. The script has many options, some of which are described in
the generic instructions included at the end of this file. All of the
options can be listed using the command `./configure --help'. There
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are five commands special options the GIMP `configure' script
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recognizes. These are:

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  --enable-shared and --disable-shared. This option affects whether
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     shared libraries will be built or not. Shared libraries provide
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     for much smaller executables. The default is to enable shared
     libraries. Disabling shared libraries is almost never a good idea.
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  --enable-debug and --disable-debug. This option causes the build
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     process to compile with debugging enabled. If debugging is
     disabled, the GIMP will instead be compiled with optimizations turned
     on. The default is for debugging to be disabled. NOTE: This
     option is intended primarily as a convenience for developers.

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  --enable-ansi and --disable-ansi. This option causes stricter
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     ANSI C checking to be performed when compiling with GCC. The
     default is for strict checking to be disabled. NOTE: This option
     is intended primarily as a convenience for developers.

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  --enable-gimpdir=DIR. This option changes the default directory
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     the gimp uses to search for its configuration files from ~/.gimp-1.3 
     (the directory .gimp-1.3 in the users home directory) to DIR.
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  --without-libtiff, without-libjpeg, --without-libpng. configure
     will bail out if libtiff, libjpeg or libpng can not be found. You
     better fix the underlying problem and install these libraries with
     their header files. If you absolutely want to compile GIMP without
     support for TIFF, JPEG or PNG you need to explicitely disable
     them using the options given above.
 
  --enable-perl and --disable-perl. The perl extension does not build
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     on all systems. If you experience problems use --disable-perl
     and gimp will not even try to built it. The perl extension does
     not usually respect the normal configure prefix but uses perl's
     instead. You can force it to use a different prefix by giving it as
     an argument to the --enable-perl option (--enable-perl=/my/prefix),
     however, you will usually have to set PERL5LIB or equivalent
     environment variables, otherwise gimp-perl will not run or you will
     get many errors on startup. See README.perl for even finer grained
     control about installation paths (and distribution making).
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  --enable-threads and --enable-mp. This options control whether to build
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     GIMP with or without support for multiple processors. This options are
     off by default. If you do have multiply processors and run GIMP with
     an OS supporting them you will like to enable this features to use
     all of your horsepower. Enabling it on singleprocessor systems won't
     harm but cause a bit processing overhead.

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  --with-sendmail=[PATH]. This option is used to tell GIMP where to find
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     the sendmail command. Normally this options don't have to be used
     because configure tries to find it in the usual places.

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  --with-gnome-desktop=[PATH]. This option specifies where to install
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     a link to the gimp.desktop file for GNOME-2.0. The default value 
     ${prefix}/share/applications should be fine if GNOME-2.0 is installed
     in the same prefix. No link is created if the specified directory
     doesn't exist or you use --without-gnome-desktop.
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The `make' command builds several things:
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 - A bunch of public libraries in the directories starting with libgimp.
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 - The plug-in programs in the `plug-ins' subdirectory.
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 - The main GIMP program 'gimp-1.3' in `app'.
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The `make install' commands installs the gimp header files associated 
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with the libgimp libraries, the plug-ins, some data files and the GIMP 
executable. After running `make install' and assuming the build process 
was successful you should be able to run `gimp'.
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When ./configure fails
======================

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'configure' uses pkg-config, a tool that replaces the old foo-config
scripts. The most recent version is available from 
	http://www.freedesktop.org/software/pkgconfig/

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'configure' tries to compile and run a short GTK program. There are
several reasons why this might fail:

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* pkg-config could not find the file 'gtk+-2.0.pc' that gets installed 
  with GTK. (This file is used to get information about where GTK+ is
  installed.)
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  Fix: Either make sure that this file is in the path where pkg-config 
  looks for it (try 'pkg-config --debug' or add the location of 
  gtk+-2.0.pc to the environment variable PKG_CONFIG_PATH before running 
  configure.
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* The GTK+ libraries were not found at run time. The details
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  of how to fix this problem will depend on the system:

  Fix: On Linux and other systems using ELF libraries, add the
  directory to /etc/ld.so.conf or to the environment variable 
  LD_LIBRARY_PATH, and run 'ldconfig'.

  On other systems, it may be necessary to encode this path
  into the executable, by setting the LDFLAGS environment variable
  before running configure. For example:

    LDFLAGS="-R/home/joe/lib" ./configure
  or
    LDFLAGS="-Wl,-rpath -Wl,/home/joe/lib" ./configure

* An old version of the GTK libraries was found instead of 
  your newly installed version. This commonly happens if a
  binary package of GTK was previously installed on your system,
  and you later compiled GTK from source.

  Fix: remove the old libraries and include files.

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* The perl extension does not detect all combinations of libraries and
  packages it needs to built properly, causing compilation to stop
  prematurely.
  
  Fix: use configure with the "--disable-perl" switch or install perl
  (version>=5.005) and the Perl-Gtk-interface.

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A detailed log of the ./configure output is written to the file
config.log. This may help diagnose problems.

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If you are sure of what you're doing, you can bypass the sanity check and
just go by what gtk-config by using the --disable-gtktest option. Please
only use this in dire circumstances.

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After fixing a problem, it is safest to delete the file 'config.cache'
before re-running ./configure.

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When ./configure fails on plug-ins
==================================

There are some GIMP plug-ins that need additional third-party libraries 
installed on your system. For example to compile the plug-ins that load 
and save JPEG, PNG or TIFF files you need the related libraries and header 
files installed, otherwise you'll get a message that plugin xyz will not 
be build. 

If you are sure that those libraries are correctly installed, but configure
fails to detect them, the following might help:

Set your LDFLAGS environment variable to look for the library in a certain
place, e.g. if you are working in a bash shell you would say:
      export LDFLAGS="-L<path_to_library> -L<path_to_another_one>"
before you run configure.

Set your CPPFLAGS environment variable to look for the header file in a
certain place, e.g. if you are working in a bash shell you would say:
      export CPPFLAGS="-I<path_to_header_file> -I<path_to_another_one>"
before you run configure.

It's wise to remove the file 'config.cache' before re-running configure.



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      Generic Instructions for Building Auto-Configured Packages
      ==========================================================


To compile this package:

1.  Configure the package for your system.  In the directory that this
file is in, type `./configure'.  If you're using `csh' on an old
version of System V, you might need to type `sh configure' instead to
prevent `csh' from trying to execute `configure' itself.

The `configure' shell script attempts to guess correct values for
various system-dependent variables used during compilation, and
creates the Makefile(s) (one in each subdirectory of the source
directory).  In some packages it creates a C header file containing
system-dependent definitions.  It also creates a file `config.status'
that you can run in the future to recreate the current configuration.
Running `configure' takes a minute or two.

To compile the package in a different directory from the one
containing the source code, you must use GNU make.  `cd' to the
directory where you want the object files and executables to go and
run `configure' with the option `--srcdir=DIR', where DIR is the
directory that contains the source code.  Using this option is
actually unnecessary if the source code is in the parent directory of
the one in which you are compiling; `configure' automatically checks
for the source code in `..' if it does not find it in the current
directory.

By default, `make install' will install the package's files in
/usr/local/bin, /usr/local/lib, /usr/local/man, etc.  You can specify
an installation prefix other than /usr/local by giving `configure' the
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option `--prefix=PATH'.
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You can specify separate installation prefixes for machine-specific
files and machine-independent files.  If you give `configure' the
option `--exec-prefix=PATH', the package will use PATH as the prefix
for installing programs and libraries.  Normally, all files are
installed using the same prefix.

`configure' ignores any other arguments that you give it.

If your system requires unusual options for compilation or linking
that `configure' doesn't know about, you can give `configure' initial
values for some variables by setting them in the environment.  In
Bourne-compatible shells, you can do that on the command line like
this:
        CC='gcc -traditional' DEFS=-D_POSIX_SOURCE ./configure

The `make' variables that you might want to override with environment
variables when running `configure' are:

(For these variables, any value given in the environment overrides the
value that `configure' would choose:)
CC              C compiler program.
                Default is `cc', or `gcc' if `gcc' is in your PATH.
INSTALL         Program to use to install files.
                Default is `install' if you have it, `cp' otherwise.
INCLUDEDIR      Directory for `configure' to search for include files.
                Default is /usr/include.

(For these variables, any value given in the environment is added to
the value that `configure' chooses:)
DEFS            Configuration options, in the form '-Dfoo -Dbar ...'
LIBS            Libraries to link with, in the form '-lfoo -lbar ...'

If you need to do unusual things to compile the package, we encourage
you to teach `configure' how to do them and mail the diffs to the
address given in the README so we can include them in the next
release.

2.  Type `make' to compile the package.

3.  Type `make install' to install programs, data files, and
documentation.

4.  You can remove the program binaries and object files from the
source directory by typing `make clean'.  To also remove the
Makefile(s), the header file containing system-dependent definitions
(if the package uses one), and `config.status' (all the files that
`configure' created), type `make distclean'.

The file `configure.in' is used as a template to create `configure' by
a program called `autoconf'.  You will only need it if you want to
regenerate `configure' using a newer version of `autoconf'.