Commit 537281e4 authored by Adam Dingle's avatar Adam Dingle Committed by Johannes Schmid

Copy edited the entire Anjuta manual, making zillions of small

2008-12-22  Adam Dingle  <adam@medovina.org>

	* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/anjuta-manual.xml:
	* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/authors.xml:
	* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/build.xml:
	* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/debugger.xml:
	* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/fileoperations.xml:
	* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/interface.xml:
	* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/introduction.xml:
	* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/preferences.xml:
	* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/projects.xml:
	* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/tools.xml:
	Copy edited the entire Anjuta manual, making zillions of small improvements to
	grammar and wording.
	Removed description of tags browser in browser toolbar; this no longer exists.
	This fixes #565381 (Anjuta manual needs copy editing).

svn path=/trunk/; revision=4478
parent 81facb97
2008-12-22 Adam Dingle <adam@medovina.org>
* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/anjuta-manual.xml:
* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/authors.xml:
* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/build.xml:
* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/debugger.xml:
* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/fileoperations.xml:
* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/interface.xml:
* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/introduction.xml:
* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/preferences.xml:
* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/projects.xml:
* manuals/anjuta-manual/C/tools.xml:
Copy edited the entire Anjuta manual, making zillions of small improvements to
grammar and wording.
Removed description of tags browser in browser toolbar; this no longer exists.
This fixes #565381 (Anjuta manual needs copy editing).
2008-12-22 Johannes Schmid <jhs@gnome.org>
* plugins/document-manager/anjuta-bookmarks.c (on_title_edited),
......@@ -48,7 +48,7 @@
<copyright>
<year>2001-2002</year>
<year>2006</year>
<year>2006-2008</year>
<holder>Naba Kumar, Andy Piper, Biswapesh Chattopadhyay</holder>
<holder>Johannes Schmid</holder>
</copyright>
......
......@@ -2,9 +2,8 @@
<title>Authors</title>
<para>
The <application>Anjuta</application> project was founded by Naba Kumar.
Please visit
<ulink type="http" url="http://anjuta.org/credits">this online list</ulink>
to know all Anjuta contributors.
<ulink type="http" url="http://anjuta.org/credits">This page</ulink>
lists all Anjuta contributors.
</para>
<para>
......@@ -12,12 +11,14 @@
website at <ulink type="http" url="http://anjuta.org/">http://anjuta.org</ulink>.
Bug reports should be made using the Bug Tracker at the project development site
<ulink type="http" url="http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/anjuta">
http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/anjuta</ulink>
http://www.sourceforge.net/projects/anjuta</ulink>.
</para>
<para>
This manual was written by Naba Kumar and Andy Piper. Please send all comments and suggestions regarding
this manual to Anjuta Devel list <email>anjuta-devel@list.sourceforge.net</email>. Comments may also be submitted via the
This manual was written by Naba Kumar, Andy Piper, Biswapesh Chattopadhyay and Johannes Schmid.
Please send all comments and suggestions regarding
this manual to the Anjuta Devel list <email>anjuta-devel@list.sourceforge.net</email>. Comments may also be submitted via the
project trackers at SourceForge.
</para>
</chapter>
......@@ -2,8 +2,8 @@
<chapter id="building">
<title>Building</title>
<para>
Anjuta handles autotools projects. It is able to cope with other kinds of
project like projects using a user written makefile but the current build
Anjuta handles <application>autotools</application> projects. It is able to cope with other kinds of
projects, such as projects using a user-written Makefile, but the current build
interface is targeted at autotools projects. Some knowledge of them is
useful to better understand the way a project is built.
</para>
......@@ -19,46 +19,46 @@
</para>
<para>
<emphasis>Build</emphasis> is the main step in which all target files are
generated from the source files. It can be divided in
two sub phases: <emphasis>Compile</emphasis> and <emphasis>Link</emphasis>.
In <emphasis>Compile</emphasis> phase each object file is generated from
generated from the source files. It can be divided into
two subphases: <emphasis>Compile</emphasis> and <emphasis>Link</emphasis>.
In the <emphasis>Compile</emphasis> phase each object file is generated from
its corresponding source file. For instance, a source file <filename>hello.c</filename>
will generate <filename>hello.o</filename> after compilation. Usually you do not need
to worry about these object files &mdash; just think of them as intermediate files.
In <emphasis>Link</emphasis> phase, all object files and libraries
In the <emphasis>Link</emphasis> phase, all object files and libraries
are linked together to create the final executable.
Some programming languages do not need a <emphasis>Compile</emphasis>
and a <emphasis>Link</emphasis> phase. Moreover the <emphasis>Build</emphasis> step
is used to generate other files, like documentation which don't need such phases.
may be used to generate other files, like documentation which doesn't need such phases.
</para>
<para>
<emphasis>Configure</emphasis> is the step in which the sources tree is adjusted
to your system. autotools projects can be built on a wide range of systems using
<emphasis>Configure</emphasis> is the step in which the source tree is adjusted
to your system. <application>autotools</application> projects can be built on a wide range of systems using
different compilers and having different library functions. This step runs a
script named <filename>configure</filename> that will check for various characteristics
of your system
and create some of the files required to perform a build (such as
<filename>Makefile</filename> and <filename>config.h</filename>).
This step is used to select build options too, for
instance, disable optimization to make debugging easier or disable some
This step is used to select build options, too; for
instance, a build option may disable optimization to make debugging easier or disable some
experimental part of a program.
</para>
<para>
<emphasis>Generate</emphasis> is the step in which the <filename>configure</filename>
script and other related files are created. The <filename>configure</filename>
script used above needs to run on
various systems and checks a lots of things. It is quite difficult to write it
by hand. Moreover the autotools stuff enforces some rules to organize a
project like some mandatory files: <filename>NEWS</filename> or <filename>COPYING</filename>.
various systems and checks a lot of things. It would be quite difficult to write it
by hand. Moreover <application>autotools</application> enforces some project organization rules
such as the presence of some mandatory files: <filename>NEWS</filename> and <filename>COPYING</filename>, for example.
It includes several tools
to check and create all necessary files from simpler files written by the developper
like <filename>configure.in</filename> (or <filename>configure.ac</filename>) and
to create necessary files from simpler files written by the developer
such as <filename>configure.in</filename> (or <filename>configure.ac</filename>) and
<filename>Makefile.am</filename>. All these tools are commonly run
from a script named <filename>autogen.sh</filename> in the project directory. This step is useful only
for a developer (someone modifying the source files), as the
<filename>configure</filename> script depends only on the sources files, it is distributed within the
<filename>configure</filename> script depends only on the source files, and is distributed within the
project package.
Note that, the makefiles created by configure included some rules
Note that the makefiles created by <application>configure</application> include some rules
to automatically regenerate the project when needed, so it often not needed to
rerun it directly.
</para>
......@@ -88,7 +88,7 @@
<para>
There is no requirement to run this only once. It can be
run at any time, usually when the configuration options need to be changed. One thing to
note is that, if the <filename>config.h</filename> file in the top level directory is
note is that if the <filename>config.h</filename> file in the top level directory is
changed, running <filename>configure</filename> again will not overwrite it.
</para>
<para>
......@@ -97,13 +97,13 @@
<guimenuitem>Configure Project&hellip;</guimenuitem></menuchoice>.
This menu item brings a dialog where you can choose:
<itemizedlist>
<listitem><para>If you want to run the generate step or not</para>
<listitem><para>Whether you want to run the generate step or not</para>
<para>
It needs to be run once at the beginning of the project then it is automatically
handled by the build process. You can force to run it by checking the check box
<interface>Regenerate project</interface> in cases you encounter some
difficulties while building the projects (such as lots of errors reported
due to mis-synchronization after modifying lots of build files).
The generate step needs to be run once at the beginning of the project; then it is automatically
handled by the build process. You can force it to run by checking the checkbox
<interface>Regenerate project</interface>; you might do this if you encounter
difficulties while building a project (e.g. if you receive build errors
after you've modified lots of build files).
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem><para>The configuration name</para>
......@@ -116,7 +116,7 @@
<listitem><para>The build directory</para>
<para>
This is the build directory name. In the Default configuration, it is the same
directory than the source directory but autotools support to build in a
directory as the source directory but autotools supports building in a
different directory.
</para>
<note><para>
......@@ -129,9 +129,8 @@
</listitem>
<listitem><para>Configure options</para>
<para>
These options are passed to the <filename>configure</filename> script. Some are standard like prefix, CFLAGS,
&hellip; some depends on the project. You can get a list of allowed configuration option by
running the <filename>configure</filename> script with --help argument.
These options are passed to the <filename>configure</filename> script. Some are standard, such as --prefix and CFLAGS; others depend on the project. You can get a list of allowed configuration options by
running the <filename>configure</filename> script with the <option>--help</option> argument.
</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
......@@ -142,20 +141,20 @@
<para>
If you have created different configurations, you can select which one is active by
selecting it in <menuchoice><guisubmenu>Build</guisubmenu>
<guimenuitem>Select Configuration</guimenuitem></menuchoice>
<guimenuitem>Select Configuration</guimenuitem></menuchoice>.
</para>
</sect2>
<sect2 id="configure">
<title>Clean a configuration</title>
<para>
To clean the project and leave it in a state that requires to rerun the
configure step, you have to choose <menuchoice><guisubmenu>Build</guisubmenu>
To clean the project and leave it in a state that requires rerunning the
configure step, choose <menuchoice><guisubmenu>Build</guisubmenu>
<guimenuitem>Remove Configuration</guimenuitem></menuchoice>.
It run "make distclean" and deletes more files than <guimenuitem>Clean Project</guimenuitem>.
It run <command>make distclean</command> and deletes more files than <guimenuitem>Clean Project</guimenuitem>.
In other words, it leaves the project
as though it has just been extracted from a distribution tarball. Note
that it does not remove the configuration directory itself but you can
do it.
that it does not remove the configuration directory itself; you can
do that yourself if you like.
</para>
</sect2>
</sect1>
......@@ -168,12 +167,12 @@
<sect2 id="build-compile">
<title>Compiling a file</title>
<para>
In a project, the individual source files can be compiled separately into objects
In a project, individual source files can be compiled separately into objects
(<filename>*.o</filename> files). Although you do not have to worry about these object
files, sometimes it is handy to compile a file first (for example, to make sure there are
no syntax errors). Building a whole project can take a lot of time, especially in the case of
larger and more complex applications. Therefore, you will probably go through a series of
edit-compile-edit-compile-.... loops while developing a project.
edit-compile iterations while developing a project.
</para>
<para>
To compile a file, choose the menu item <menuchoice><guisubmenu>Build</guisubmenu>
......@@ -186,34 +185,33 @@
<title>Building an executable</title>
<para>
<application>Anjuta</application> has no separate link command, simply because
it is not necessary. The build process will compile all the source files and link them together
along with the libraries. The build command will note recompile those files which are
it is not necessary. The build process will compile all source files and link them together
along with the necessary libraries. The build command will not recompile those files which are
already up-to-date (this is called the <emphasis>dependency check</emphasis>).
If you have already compiled all of the files individually, then the only thing the build
If you have already compiled all files individually, then the only thing the build
step performs is the link. If you have already built the project and no dependent file has been
modified, even the link stage will be skipped.
</para>
<para>
So how exactly does the dependency check influence the project development?
So how exactly does the dependency check influence project development?
If you have modified a file, then all of the source files that depend on the modified
file are recompiled. All files (not only the object files and executable) in the
file are recompiled. All files (not just the object files and executable) in the
project are checked for these dependencies during the build process. If it is found that
a particular file is dependent on some other file which has been modified, then that file
will be re-generated.
will be regenerated.
</para>
<para>
Since you have now got a rough understanding of the value of the dependency check, can
you imagine how your life (as a programmer) would be if it had not been there? If you
cannot answer just yet, then will find out when you start developing big projects!
Can you imagine how your life (as a programmer) would be if the dependency check were not there? If you
cannot answer just yet, then you will find out when you start developing big projects!
</para>
<para>
<menuchoice><guisubmenu>Build</guisubmenu><guimenuitem>Build</guimenuitem></menuchoice>
will build all of the files in the directory of the currently active file.
will build all files in the directory of the currently active file.
</para>
<para>
<menuchoice><guisubmenu>Build</guisubmenu>
<guimenuitem>Build Project</guimenuitem></menuchoice> will build
the whole project &mdash; all of the subdirectories are built recursively.
the whole project &mdash; all subdirectories are built recursively.
</para>
</sect2>
</sect1>
......@@ -226,9 +224,9 @@
<sect2 id="build-dist">
<title>Creating a distribution package</title>
<para>
To build the tarball distribution of the project choose <menuchoice><guisubmenu>Build</guisubmenu>
To build a tarball distribution of the project choose <menuchoice><guisubmenu>Build</guisubmenu>
<guimenuitem>Build Tarball</guimenuitem></menuchoice>. This will create a
tarball (<filename>*.tar.gz</filename>) and put it in the top level project directory.
tarball (<filename>*.tar.gz</filename>) and put it in the top-level project directory.
Copy the file to a safe place for distribution.
</para>
</sect2>
......@@ -240,12 +238,12 @@
application on your system.
</para>
<note>
<title>System wide installation</title>
<title>System-wide installation</title>
<para>
You must be logged in as root to perform a system-wide install. Also note that for a GNOME
application to use the pixmaps in the project, it must be installed as a system-wide
application. Otherwise, when the application is executed in your project, there will be
lots of &quot;pixmap not found&quot; errors. You can configure anjuta to use <command>sudo</command>
lots of &quot;pixmap not found&quot; errors. You can configure Anjuta to use <command>sudo</command>
or <command>su</command> before installing the project in the build preferences.
</para>
</note>
......@@ -259,7 +257,7 @@
</para>
<para>
Choose the menu item <menuchoice><guisubmenu>Build</guisubmenu>
<guimenuitem>Clean Project</guimenuitem></menuchoice> to clean all the project
<guimenuitem>Clean Project</guimenuitem></menuchoice> to clean all project
files.
</para>
<para>
......
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......@@ -4,10 +4,10 @@
<sect1 id="menu-and-shortcuts">
<title>Menus and shortcuts</title>
<para>
At the top of the <application>Anjuta</application> main window is the menubar.
Almost all of the functions are available by activating the appropriate
menu item. The functions have been grouped according to their type. For
example, the file operations have been grouped into
At the top of the <application>Anjuta</application> main window is the menu bar.
You can access almost all of Anjuta's functionality through
menu items. Operations have been grouped according to their type. For
example, file operations have been grouped into
the <guisubmenu>File</guisubmenu> menu.
</para>
......@@ -19,12 +19,6 @@
</screenshot>
</figure>
<para>
Most of the menus and submenus can be detached. Click on the detach bar
(the dashed line just above the first menu item). Once the menu is
detached, it will become an independent window.
</para>
<figure id="file-menu">
<title>File menu</title>
<screenshot>
......@@ -34,51 +28,53 @@
</figure>
<para>
Shortcut keys are available for many of the menu options. All of the shortcut
keys are shown alongside the corresponding menu items. A useful reference to
the shortcut keys which are not directly attached with the menu is also available
in the next section. Some useful shortcuts are listed here.
Shortcut keys are available for many menu items. All shortcut
keys are shown alongside the corresponding menu items. Some other useful shortcuts are listed here.
</para>
<para>
<itemizedlist>
<listitem>
<para>
<emphasis>Switch Editor page:</emphasis> CTRL-TAB (forward) and CTRL-SHIFT-TAB (backward) -- The pages could
also be switched by right clicking on the notebook tabs and selecting an editor tab
(useful when all the tabs in the editor are not visible at once). Some desktop configuration
<emphasis>Switch Editor Page:</emphasis> <keycombo><keycap>Ctrl</keycap><keycap>Tab</keycap></keycombo>
(forward) and <keycombo><keycap>Ctrl</keycap><keycap>Shift</keycap><keycap>Tab</keycap></keycombo>
(backward). You can
also switch pages by right-clicking on the notebook tabs and selecting a filename from the pop-up menu
(useful when all the tabs in the editor are not visible at once). Some desktop configurations
may already have these shortcut keys assigned. In that case, you will need to reconfigure them
(not in anjuta, because they are fixed) if you want to avail these shortcuts.
(not in Anjuta, because they are fixed) if you want to use these shortcuts.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<emphasis>Context Help:</emphasis> SHIFT-F1 -- Keep the cursor on the word (for example, the
function name) for which you want to get the API help and press the shortcut. Context help
only works if you have <application>DevHelp</application> installed. If you do not have
<application>DevHelp</application> installed, the context help menu and toolbar button
will be inactive. You can get it from <application>DevHelp</application>
website. You will also have to install the related <application>DevHelp</application> books.
<emphasis>Context Help:</emphasis> <keycombo><keycap>Shift</keycap><keycap>F1</keycap></keycombo>.
Place the cursor on the word (for example, the
function name) for which you want to get API help and type this shortcut. Context help
only works if you have <application>Devhelp</application> installed; otherwise,
the context help menu and toolbar button
will be inactive. You can get Devhelp from the <application>Devhelp</application>
website. You will also have to install the related <application>Devhelp</application> books.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<emphasis>Auto complete:</emphasis> CTRL-ENTER -- Press the shortcut with the cursor placed
at the end of incomplete word and a list of words matching the remaining part will appear.
<emphasis>Autocomplete:</emphasis> <keycombo><keycap>Ctrl</keycap><keycap>Enter</keycap></keycombo>.
Type this shortcut with the cursor placed
at the end of an incomplete word and a list of words matching the remaining part will appear.
Scroll and select the right word from the list if you find one.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
<emphasis>More shortcuts:</emphasis> Look for the shortcut keys displayed on right side
of the menu item labels. They could also be changed as explained in the tip below.
<emphasis>More shortcuts:</emphasis> Look for the shortcut keys displayed on the right side
of menu item labels. Shortcuts can also be changed as explained in the tip below.
</para>
</listitem>
</itemizedlist>
<tip>
<title>Customize shortcuts</title>
<para>
You can change the default shortcuts by using <menuchoice><guisubmenu>Edit</guisubmenu>
You can change the default shortcuts by choosing <menuchoice><guisubmenu>Edit</guisubmenu>
<guimenuitem>Preferences</guimenuitem></menuchoice> and selecting the <interface>
Shortcuts</interface> tab.
</para>
......@@ -90,7 +86,7 @@
<sect1 id="main-win">
<title>Main Window</title>
<para>
In the main window, there are several views which can be reordered by
The main window contains several view windows which can be rearranged by
dragging on their title bars. They can also be minimized by clicking on the
minimize buttons on the left of title bars.
</para>
......@@ -101,8 +97,8 @@
<para>
The <interface>Documents window</interface>
will have one document active at a time (if there are any files opened). All
of the file commands will apply to this active document. You can switch to
any page by clicking on the page tab. You can do the same by right-clicking
file commands will apply to this active document. You can switch to
any document by clicking on its tab. You can do the same by right-clicking
on the page tabs and choosing the document from the pop-up menu that will
appear. This is especially useful when you have a lot of files opened, but not
all of them are visible in the page tab area.
......@@ -110,7 +106,7 @@
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
The <interface>Project window</interface> shows a tree of the project files if
The <interface>Project window</interface> shows a tree of project files if
you have a project opened. Otherwise, the <interface>Project window</interface>
is usually hidden. Double-clicking on any item in the
<interface>Project window</interface> will open that file.
......@@ -119,16 +115,16 @@
<listitem>
<para>
The <interface>Files window</interface> shows a file tree. If no project is open, the file
tree usually points to the file system root but you can change it in the preferences. If a project is
open it shows all files inside the project. Double clicking opens a file in the appropriate application
as configured in the gnome mime preferences. Right click opens a popup-menu which gives you
choices how to open the file.
tree usually points to the file system root but you can change this in the preferences. If a project is
open, the window shows all files in the project. Double-clicking opens a file in the appropriate application
as configured in the GNOME MIME preferences. Right-clicking opens a context menu which gives you
choices about how to open the file.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
The <interface>Symbols window</interface> shows shows a tree of available symbols in the project
generated from ctags parser. Double clicking opens an editor window with the corresponding file
The <interface>Symbols window</interface> shows a tree of available symbols in the project
generated from the <application>ctags</application> parser. Double-clicking opens an editor window with the corresponding file
and line.
</para>
<para>
......@@ -147,14 +143,14 @@
</para>
<para>
The colors used to display the messages are important. Messages
displayed in the standard foreground color (usually Black) are normal
messages. Those displayed in Blue are important messages such as errors or
other information. Messages shown in Red are <emphasis>Hot Linked</emphasis>.
Double-clicking on such a message will take you to the particular file and
displayed in the standard foreground color (usually black) are normal
messages. Messages displayed in orange are warnings, and those displayed in red are errors.
Warning and error messages are <emphasis>linked</emphasis>:
double-clicking on such a message will take you to the particular file and
line number specified in the message.
</para>
<para>
For example, when you compile a file which contains bugs, some red
For example, when you compile a file which contains errors, some red
messages will appear showing what the problems are, and where they occur.
Double-clicking on such messages will open the file and highlight the
line containing the error.
......@@ -162,8 +158,8 @@
</listitem>
<listitem>
<para>
The <interface>Terminal window</interface> is a terminal emulation where you can type commands
just like in the gnome-terminal.
The <interface>Terminal window</interface> is a terminal emulator where you can type commands
just like in the GNOME Terminal application.
</para>
</listitem>
</orderedlist>
......@@ -171,7 +167,7 @@
<note>
<title>Session management</title>
<para>
All of the settings, including the window sizes and window positions, are
All settings, including window sizes and positions, are
saved when you exit <application>Anjuta</application>. Session management is still
under development, so you should not exit <application>Anjuta</application> with
any unsaved documents. <application>Anjuta</application> will display a warning
......
......@@ -4,24 +4,26 @@
<para>
<application>Anjuta</application> is a versatile Integrated Development
Environment (IDE) for the GNOME desktop. It features a number of advanced
programming facilities that include project management, application
wizards, an on-board interactive debugger, an integrated glade UI designer,
integrated devhelp API help, an integrated valgrind memory profiler,
programming facilities includes project management, application
wizards, an interactive debugger, an integrated Glade UI designer,
integrated Devhelp API help, an integrated Valgrind memory profiler,
an integrated gprof performance profiler, a class generator, a powerful
source editor, source browsing, and more. is a versatile Integrated
Development Environment
source editor, source browsing, and more.
</para>
<para>
Anjuta DevStudio has been designed to be simple to operate yet powerful enough
to fulfill all your programming needs. Many features have evolved since the
early days and several very attractive ones added. Our focus is on delivering
power and usability at the same time without overloading your senses and
making your software development a pleasurable process. We will always be
busy getting you one of the best IDE experiences by straighting up all
the neat features and stabilizing it. We hope you will have a good time
to fulfill all your programming needs. We've added many new features to Anjuta
over the course of its development. Our focus is on delivering
power and usability at the same time and
making your software development enjoyable without overloading your senses. We intend to
continue improving and stabilizing Anjuta to give you the best IDE experience possible.
We hope you will have a good time
using Anjuta. If not, please help us make it better by reporting bugs and
suggestions. Here are some of the things you will find in Anjuta.
suggestions.
</para>
<para>
The following screenshot illustrates some of the things you will find in Anjuta.
</para>
<para>
......@@ -35,18 +37,18 @@
</para>
<para>
Anjuta has a very flexible and advanced docking system that allows you to
layout all views in whatever way you like. You can drag and drop the views
using drag bars and re-arrange the layout. The layouts are persistent for
each project so you can maintain different layouts required by projects.
All dock views are minimizable to avoid clutter in main window. Minimized
views appear as icons on left side of main window. All menu actions are
configurable either by type-in-the-menu (the usual GNOME way) or by
a dedicated shortcuts configuration UI.
Anjuta has a flexible and advanced docking system that allows you to
lay out all views in whatever way you like. You can drag and drop the views
using drag bars and rearrange the layout. The layouts are persistent for
each project so you can maintain different layouts for different projects.
All dock views are minimizable to avoid clutter in the main window. Minimized
views appear as icons on the left side of the main window. You can configure all menu actions
either by typing when the cursor is over a menu item (the usual GNOME way) or through
a dedicated shortcut configuration user interface.
</para>
<para>
Please report any problems with <application>Anjuta</application> - this will help to
improve the software, as well as helping the Open Source community.
improve the software, as well as helping the open source community.
</para>
</chapter>
......@@ -2,25 +2,22 @@
<chapter id="preferences">
<title>Preferences</title>
<para>
Preferences are ways to customize <application>anjuta</application> to suit
your tastes. Activate <menuchoice><guimenu>Settings</guimenu><guimenuitem>Preferences</guimenuitem>
</menuchoice> to bring up the preferences dialog. If you want to reset the preferences to their
default values, it can be done from <menuchoice><guimenu>Settings</guimenu><guimenuitem>
Set Default Preferences</guimenuitem></menuchoice>. Some are explained below.
Preferences are ways to customize <application>Anjuta</application> to suit
your tastes. Activate <menuchoice><guimenu>Edit</guimenu><guimenuitem>Preferences</guimenuitem>
</menuchoice> to bring up the preferences dialog. Some preferences are explained below.
</para>
<sect1 id="prefs-general"><title>General</title>
<orderedlist>
<listitem><para>
<emphasis>Project Directory</emphasis> is the path where you plan to put all your projects.
Application wizard creates new projects in this directory only. The default project directory
is ~/Projects and generally, this is just fine for most people. Also, when Open project is
activated, this is the base directory where the file selection will start.
The application wizard creates new projects in this directory only. The default project directory
is ~/Projects and generally this is fine for most people.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem><para>
<emphasis>User Info:</emphasis> Provide your correct Name and Email address here. They are not
used to do software registration (pun), rather they are used to create ChangeLog entries and other
insert text bits.</para>
<emphasis>User Info:</emphasis> Provide your name and email address here. These are not
used to do software registration; rather, they are used to create ChangeLog entries and other
text insertions.</para>
</listitem>
</orderedlist>
</sect1>
......@@ -28,12 +25,12 @@
<orderedlist>
<listitem><para>
<emphasis>Root directory if no project is open</emphasis> is the path where
the root of the file manager points to if no project is currently open.
the root of the file manager points if no project is currently open.
</para>
</listitem>
<listitem><para>
<emphasis>File Filter:</emphasis> It is possible to filter out some file from the file tree, for example
hidden files or files that are ignored by the version control system which usually means they are
<emphasis>File Filter:</emphasis> You can filter out some files from the file tree, for example,
hidden files, or files that are ignored by the version control system which usually means they are
generated at build time and should not be changed.
</para>
</listitem>
......
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
<sect1 id="tools-intro">
<title>Introduction</title>
<para>
Often, you'll find the inbuilt functionality provided by Anjuta to be
You'll sometimes find the built-in functionality provided by Anjuta to be
insufficient. In these cases, you might be tempted to either add the
feature yourself to the Anjuta codebase or submit a feature request to
implement the feature. However, both approaches are likely to be slow
......@@ -15,10 +15,10 @@
<para>
Anjuta provides a powerful framework for defining user-defined tools for
extending it's functionality. Tools have access to almost all features of
extending its functionality. Tools have access to almost all features of
the IDE through the use of variables. You can add tools under any menu item,
specify input, output and error redirection within the GUI framework and
supply command line parameters to the tool.
supply command-line parameters to the tool.
</para>
<note>
<para>
......@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@
<title>Tools Examples</title>
<para>
This is a simple example how to use the tools plugin to integrate the GNOME ChangeLog
generation script
generation script.
</para>
<figure id="tool-list">
......
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